Explore by topic

Deaths involving coronavirus (COVID-19)


There were 820 deaths involving coronavirus (COVID-19) registered in the latest week (week ending 8 October 2021), accounting for 6.6% of all deaths in the UK. This is a decrease from 974 deaths in the week before.

Mortality rates due to COVID-19 increased between August and September 2021 in England and Wales.

On this page

Deaths

There were 820 deaths involving coronavirus (COVID-19) registered in the UK in the week ending 8 October 2021. Of these, 582 were registered in England, 81 in Wales, 126 in Scotland, and 28 in Northern Ireland. Figures for England and Wales exclude deaths of non-residents, therefore the sum may differ from the total UK figure.

Weekly death registrations for Scotland and Northern Ireland are produced and published by National Records of Scotland and Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency.

Last updated: 19/10/2021

Read more about this in Deaths registered weekly in England and Wales, provisional

🠕 Back to the top

Mortality rates due to COVID-19 in England and Wales in September 2021 increased significantly from the previous month.

In September 2021, COVID-19 remained the third most common cause of death in England. In Wales, COVID-19 was the third most common cause of death, its highest ranking since March 2021.

Last updated: 22/10/2021

Read more about this in Monthly mortality analysis, England and Wales

🠕 Back to the top

Deaths from all causes were above the five-year average

Number of deaths registered by week, England and Wales, 28 December 2019 to 8 October 2021

Embed code

Download the data

The number of deaths from all causes was 13.1% above the five-year average in the latest week (week ending 8 October 2021).

The total number of deaths registered between the weeks ending 13 March 2020 and 8 October 2021 in England and Wales was 945,059. Of these, 149,219 mentioned COVID-19 on the death certificate (15.8%).

Last updated: 19/10/2021

Read more about this in Deaths registered weekly in England and Wales, provisional

🠕 Back to the top

Between December 2019 and July 2021 excess deaths were high, even after accounting for mortality displacement. Until mid-March 2020, the number of death occurrences was generally below average. This was followed by a period of excess deaths which peaked on 8 April 2020. On less than half of the days between 12 June 2020 and 13 October 2020 the number of excess deaths was below average. However, this was not enough to counter the high number of deaths earlier in the year. Following this there was another period of excess deaths, which peaked on 19 January 2021. From the end of February 2021 to 2 July 2021 the number of deaths was generally below average.

Mortality displacement occurs when vulnerable people die sooner than expected. Therefore, these individuals are not dying in the following days, weeks, or months, where they would likely have died, potentially leading to a lower-than-average period of mortality. This was mainly seen in older people and in hospitals. However, deaths below average were not enough to counter the high number of deaths since the start of the pandemic.

Last updated: 15/10/2021

Read more about this in Mortality displacement in England and Wales: 2020 to 2021

🠕 Back to the top

Pre-existing health conditions

Diabetes was the most common pre-existing condition among COVID-19 deaths in England and Wales between April and June 2021

Proportion of death certificates where the death was due to COVID-19 that had a top 20 (by frequency) pre-existing condition, England and Wales, registered between April and June 2021

Embed code

Download the data

Of deaths in England and Wales where COVID-19 was the underlying cause, the most common pre-existing condition recorded on the death certificate was diabetes (April to June 2021). This was identified in almost a quarter (23%) of COVID-19 deaths.

Dementia and Alzheimer’s disease dropped from second most common pre-existing condition (January to March 2021) to joint seventh most common pre-existing condition. This was accompanied by a decrease in the proportion of COVID-19 deaths that were of individuals aged 65 years and over. However, even for people aged 65 years and over, the proportion of COVID-19 deaths with dementia and Alzheimer’s as a pre-existing condition decreased.

Pre-existing health conditions are recorded if they are believed to have made some contribution to the death. Deaths may be counted more than once as someone may have more than one pre-existing condition. Health conditions may not be included if they were not considered relevant.

Last updated: 23/08/2021 

Read more about this in Monthly mortality analysis, England and Wales

🠕 Back to the top

Deaths by region

How excess deaths changed each month where you live up to April 2021

Deaths registered by MSOA each month, March 2020 to April 2021, compared with the average for the same month between 2015 and 2019, England and Wales

Embed code

Download the data

Use your postcode to see the number of excess deaths each month in your neighbourhood.

There are 7,201 neighbourhoods (officially known as Middle-layer Super Output Areas or MSOAs) in England and Wales with an average population of around 8,000. Some neighbourhoods saw more than twice as many residents die than would have been expected for the time of year during the spring and summer of 2020, while excess deaths were spread out over a longer period in the following autumn and winter.

Deaths between March 2020 and April 2021 are compared with the average for the same month between 2015 and 2019.

Last updated: 03/08/2021

Read more about this in Excess deaths in your neighbourhood during the coronavirus (COVID-19)

🠕 Back to the top

Deaths by sex

COVID-19 mortality rates were higher for men than women

Age-standardised and age-specific mortality rates for deaths due to COVID-19 by sex and age group, per 100,000 people, England and Wales, 2020

Embed code

Download the data

Mortality rates due to COVID-19 were significantly higher for men than women across all age groups. Men accounted for over a half (55.6%) of COVID-19 deaths in 2020. 

Mortality rates increased with age group, from 15.9 deaths per 100,000 people under 65 years to 2,918.1 deaths per 100,000 people aged 90 years and over. 

Last updated: 06/07/2021 

Read more about this in Deaths due to COVID-19, registered in England and Wales: 2020

🠕 Back to the top

Further information


The Office for National Statistics’ (ONS) weekly provisional counts of the number of deaths registered in England and Wales includes all deaths with coronavirus (COVID-19) mentioned on the death certificate. Figures presented on the latest insights tool are different from the daily surveillance figures on COVID-19 deaths published by the Department of Health and Social Care, which provide daily and cumulative deaths occurring within 28 days of a positive test.

To find out more about deaths data from different sources visit our more information page.

🠕 Back to the top


Embed code

Contact

Latest insights team
infection.survey.analysis@ons.gov.uk