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Coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccination


Two doses of the Pfizer/BioNTech or Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine are estimated to be 96% and 92% effective against hospitalisation with the Delta variant, respectively. COVID-19 Infection Survey participants who became infected post vaccination were less likely to have symptoms. 

The majority (90%) of people aged 16 to 29 years have received or would be likely to accept a COVID-19 vaccine if offered (30 June to 4 July 2021). While positive sentiment towards the vaccine remains high, Black or Black British adults and those living in more deprived areas were more likely to report vaccine hesitancy. 

Official data updated daily on the number of people who have received a COVID-19 vaccination is collated by Public Health England and is available on the GOV.UK coronavirus dashboard.

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Vaccinations

Across all four UK countries, there is a clear pattern between vaccination and testing positive for COVID-19 antibodies

Modelled percentage of: adults testing positive for antibodies to SARS-CoV-2, adults who have received one or more doses of a COVID-19 vaccine; and fully vaccinated adults, UK country, 7 December 2020 to 4 July 2021

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An estimated 91.9% of the adult population in England, 92.6% in Wales, 90.0% in Northern Ireland and 88.6% in Scotland tested positive for COVID-19 antibodies in the week beginning 28 June 2021. The presence of antibodies suggests a person previously had COVID-19 or has been vaccinated.

Estimated vaccination rates continued to increase in the week beginning 28 June 2021. Across the four UK countries, 86.4% to 91.4% had received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 61.2% to 72.7% are fully vaccinated. These vaccination estimates will differ from daily official government figures, which are actual numbers of vaccines recorded. 

Last updated: 21/07/2021

Read more about this in Coronavirus (COVID-19) Infection Survey: antibody data for the UK

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Vaccine attitudes

9 in 10 (90%) people aged 16 to 29 years have received or would be likely to accept a COVID-19 vaccine if offered

Adults in Great Britain, December 2020 to July 2021

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This week, 96% of all adults reported that they have now received or would be very or fairly likely to accept a COVID-19 vaccine if offered (30 June to 4 July 2021). Of those aged 16 to 29 years, 9 in 10 (90%) reported positive vaccine sentiment. This proportion was 63% at the start of the vaccination programme in December 2020. From 17 June 2021, all adults aged over 18 years are now able to book a COVID-19 vaccine in England.

Declining a vaccine, being unlikely to accept a vaccine or being undecided (4%) is referred to as vaccine hesitancy.

Last updated: 09/07/2021 

Read more about this in Coronavirus and the social impacts on Great Britain

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More than 4 in 10 primary school parents and 5 in 10 secondary school parents definitely want their child to have a COVID-19 vaccine

12 April to 21 May 2021, England

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More than 4 in 10 primary school parents (43%) and 5 in 10 secondary school parents (53%) reported that they would definitely want their child to have a COVID-19 vaccine. Just 4% of primary school parents and 3% of secondary school parents said they would definitely not want their child to have a vaccine. The most common reasons given by parents who said that they would definitely not want their child to have a vaccine were: wanting more information on the long-term side effects, not enough research has been carried out, and concerns about vaccine safety and side effects. 

Last updated: 01/07/2021 

Read more about this in COVID-19 Schools Infection Survey Round 5, England: May 2021

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Adults living in the most deprived areas were more likely to report vaccine hesitancy

Vaccine hesitancy based on Index of Multiple Deprivation (IMD), England, 26 May to 20 June 2021

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Adults living in the most deprived areas of England were almost three times as likely to report vaccine hesitancy (8%) than adults living in the least deprived areas (3%). 

Last updated: 02/07/2021 

Read more about this in Coronavirus and vaccine hesitancy, Great Britain

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Vaccine effectiveness

Vaccinated participants in our Coronavirus (COVID-19) Infection Survey were less likely to develop symptoms if infected

  • Of the adults in the Coronavirus (COVID-19) Infection Survey, the risk of becoming infected after vaccination was highest during the first 21 days after their first dose. 

  • Vaccinated participants who got infected were less likely to have symptoms and high viral loads (amount of the virus present on their tests) than unvaccinated participants. 

Last updated: 17/06/2021 

Read more about this in Coronavirus (COVID-19) Infection Survey Technical Article: Analysis of positivity after vaccination

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Two doses of the Pfizer/BioNTech or Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine are estimated to be 96% and 92% effective against hospitalisation with the Delta variant, respectively

  • Vaccine effectiveness against symptomatic cases with the Delta variant is estimated to be 88% after both doses of the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine and 67% after both doses of the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine. 

  • Two doses of the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine are estimated to be 96% effective against hospitalisation with the Delta variant (94% after one dose) compared with 95% with the Alpha variant. 

  • Two doses of the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine are estimated to be 92% effective against hospitalisation with the Delta variant (71% after one dose) compared with 86% with the Alpha variant. 

Last updated: 18/06/2021 

Read more about this in Effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccines against hospital admission with the Delta (B.1.617.2) variant

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Vaccines and ethnicity

Vaccine hesitancy is over four times higher among Black or Black British adults compared with White adults

Great Britain, 26 May to 20 June 2021

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Black or Black British adults were most likely to report vaccine hesitancy compared with White adults. Almost 1 in 5 (18%) Black or Black British adults reported vaccine hesitancy, compared with 4% of White adults (26 May to 20 June 2021). 

Vaccine hesitancy refers to those who have either declined a COVID-19 vaccine offer, report being unlikely to accept a vaccine or report being undecided. 

Last updated: 02/07/2021 

Read more about this in Coronavirus and vaccine hesitancy, Great Britain

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Amongst adults aged 50 years and over, all ethnic minority groups were less likely to have received a COVID-19 vaccination than people in the White British group. The rates were lowest amongst Black Caribbean (66.8%), Black African (71.2%) and Pakistani (78.4%) adults. Although lower than the rates among the White British group, rates among people identifying as Indian (90.9%) and Bangladeshi (86.9%) remained high. Geographical factors, socio-demographic characteristics and underlying health conditions were taken into account but only partly explained the lower vaccination rates among ethnic minority groups. 

Last updated: 06/05/2021 

Read more about this in Coronavirus and vaccination rates in people aged 50 years and over by socio-demographic characteristic, England: 8 December 2020 to 12 April 2021

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Further information


This page provides an overview of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic in the UK, bringing together data from multiple sources. Each graphic provides a link to explore the topic further. See the more information page to read about different data sources used in the tool.

The tool is updated regularly when relevant data are published. This is typically at least twice a week, for example:

  • when weekly deaths registrations are published (usually on a Tuesday)

  • when results from the Coronavirus (COVID-19) Infection Survey, and Opinions and Lifestyle Survey are published (usually on a Friday)

Daily updates on COVID-19 levels and vaccinations can be found on GOV.UK.

Some policy areas are devolved and more information is available for Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales.

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Contact

Latest insights team
infection.survey.analysis@ons.gov.uk