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Coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccination


Rates for unvaccinated adults were higher for Black Caribbean, Black African and White Other ethnic groups. Rates were also higher for those living in deprived areas, who have never worked or are long-term unemployed, who are limited a lot by a disability, who identify as Muslim or as having an “Other Religion” or who are male (July 2022).

Official data on the number of people who have received a COVID-19 vaccination are available on the GOV.UK coronavirus dashboard.

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Vaccination rates

As of 22 July 2022, among those aged 12 to 15 years, 62.4% had received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine and 45.3% had received at least two doses.

Among those aged 16 to 17 years, 80.5% had received at least one dose, 69.8% had received at least two doses and 29.5% had received at least three doses.

Vaccination rates varied by pupil characteristics. Among those aged 12 to 15 years, rates were lowest for pupils:

  • from the Gypsy or Roma (15.8%) and Black Caribbean (16.5%) ethnic groups

  • who speak English as an additional language (47.2%)

  • who have an identified special educational need (57.2%)

  • living in the most deprived areas (44.8%)

  • who are eligible for free school meals (44.3%)

Pupils’ ages are defined as their age at the start of the 2021 to 2022 academic year.

Last updated: 23/09/2022

Read more about this in our Coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccination uptake in school pupils, England: up to July 2022 bulletin

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Parental vaccination status had the biggest impact on vaccine uptake in pupils. Among those aged 12 to 15 years, pupils living in a household where at least one parent has received three or more doses of the COVID-19 vaccine, were the most likely to have received a COVID-19 vaccine (81.6% received at least one dose and 63.0% at least two).

This compares with 30.5% and 12.4% respectively for pupils where at least one parent has received two doses (but no parent has received three). For pupils living in a household where no parents have been vaccinated, 5.3% had received at least one dose and 2.1% at least two doses.

Last updated: 23/09/2022

Read more about this in our Coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccination uptake in school pupils, England: up to July 2022 bulletin

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The proportion of people aged 18 years and over who were unvaccinated in July 2022 was highest for those identifying as Black Caribbean (39.1%), followed by those identifying as White Other (25.2%) and Black African (24.8%). The lowest proportions of unvaccinated adults were in the White British (8.6%) and Indian (9.2%) ethnic groups.

This is also reflected in rates for people aged 18 years and over receiving two or three COVID-19 vaccinations, where the lowest proportions were for those identifying as Black Caribbean (57.4% have received two vaccinations and 39.2% have received three vaccinations). Those identifying as White British had the highest proportions receiving two vaccinations (89.5%) and three vaccinations (77.6%).

The proportion of adults who were unvaccinated was also higher for those:

  • living in more deprived areas, urban areas, or social rented housing

  • who were not born in the UK or did not have English as a main language

  • who have never worked or are long-term unemployed

  • who are limited a lot by a disability

  • who identify as Muslim or as having an “Other Religion”

  • who were male

Last updated: 12/09/2022

Find out more in our Coronavirus and vaccination rates in people aged 18 years and over by socio-demographic characteristic and region, England dataset

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Vaccine effectiveness

Unvaccinated people accounted for a higher proportion of patients admitted to critical care with confirmed COVID-19 than of the population aged over 18 years. The proportion of critical care patients with confirmed COVID-19 who are unvaccinated has fallen from nearly three-quarters (74%) in May 2021 to just over a quarter (27%) in February 2022. However, this is a result of more people becoming vaccinated. Unvaccinated people have consistently accounted for a higher proportion of critical care patients than in the general population. This was 3 times higher in February 2022 and peaked at almost 7 times higher in December 2021.

Last updated: 15/07/2022

Read more about this in the ICNARC report on COVID-19 in critical care: England, Wales and Northern Ireland

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COVID-19 vaccination is equally effective at reducing COVID-19 hospital admissions in pregnant and non-pregnant women

For both pregnant and non-pregnant women, rates of COVID-19 hospital admissions were lower for those who were vaccinated at least 14 days before they were first infected than those who were unvaccinated (8 December 2020 to 31 August 2021).

Compared with those who were unvaccinated, the rate of COVID-19 hospitalisation was:

  • 76.3% lower for pregnant women who had received one dose of a vaccine

  • 78.6% lower for non-pregnant women who had received one dose of a vaccine

  • 83.1% lower for double-vaccinated pregnant women

  • 81.6% lower for double-vaccinated non-pregnant women

This was after adjusting for factors relating to vaccine uptake and risk of COVID-19 hospitalisation.

The reduction of risk in COVID-19 hospital admission was similar for both pregnant and non-pregnant women. This suggests that COVID-19 vaccination is equally effective at reducing COVID-19 hospital admission in pregnant and non-pregnant women.

Last updated: 11/07/2022

Read more about this in our Coronavirus (COVID-19) hospital admissions by vaccination and pregnancy status, England: 8 December 2020 to 31 August 2021

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Further information


On this page we present vaccination estimates from the Coronavirus (COVID-19) Infection Survey and vaccine attitudes from the Opinions and Lifestyle Survey. These are different from official vaccination records reported on GOV.UK coronavirus dashboard.

To find out more about vaccination data from different sources visit our more information page.

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Contact

Latest insights team
infection.survey.analysis@ons.gov.uk