About this dataset

Presents data on death registrations in the United Kingdom by area of usual residence. The release contains a summary table providing key mortality measures (numbers and rates including age-standardised mortality rates) for the United Kingdom and its constituent countries.

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Important notes and usage information

Main points from latest release

  • In 2015, the age-standardised mortality rate (ASMR) for the UK was 1,010.0 deaths per 100,000 population.
  • In 2015, the ASMR for England was 986.6 deaths per 100,000 population, compared with 1,064.4 in Wales, 1,177.3 in Scotland and 1,045.2 in Northern Ireland.
  • The North East had the highest ASMR among the regions of England in 2015, with 1,128.7 deaths per 100,000 population.
  • The South East had the lowest ASMR among the regions of England in 2015, with 912.7 deaths per 100,000 population.
  • The local authority in England with the highest ASMR was Blackpool (1,380.9 deaths per 100,000 population) while City of London had the lowest (542.1 deaths per 100,000 population).
  • In Wales, Blaenau Gwent had the highest ASMR (1,195.4 deaths per 100,000 population) while Monmouthshire had the lowest (896.5 deaths per 100,000 population).
  • In Scotland, Glasgow City had the highest ASMR (1,448.7 deaths per 100,000 population) while East Dunbartonshire had the lowest (926.9 deaths per 100,000 population).
  • In Northern Ireland, Belfast had the highest ASMR (1,200.8 deaths per 100,000 population) while Causeway Coast and Glens had the lowest (955.8 deaths per 100,000 population).
  • The substantial variation in mortality rates between different local areas reflects underlying differences in factors such as income deprivation, socio-economic position and health behaviour (for further information see Health state life expectancies, UK: 2013 to 2015).
  • In 2015, the West Midlands had the highest regional infant mortality rate, with 6.1 deaths per 1,000 live births.
  • In 2015, the South East had the lowest regional infant mortality rate, with 3.0 deaths per 1,000 live births.
  • The variation in infant mortality rates between different regions reflects underlying differences in maternal factors such as the mother’s country of birth, socio-economic position and age.
  • Infant mortality rates for local areas can fluctuate quite substantially between years due to the small number of deaths recorded at these ages.