In this section

  • Events affecting the UK population and people including conceptions and fertility rates, maternities, live births and stillbirths, marriages, divorces, civil partnerships, cohabitation, family composition, life expectancies and deaths. Life event statistics tell us about the size and condition of the population.

  • Figures on crime levels and trends for England and Wales based primarily on two sets of statistics: the Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW) and police recorded crime data.

  • How people in the UK see themselves today in terms of ethnicity, sexual identity, religion and language, and how this has changed over time. We use a diverse range of sources for this data.

  • Early years childcare, school and college education, and higher education and adult learning, including qualifications, personnel, and safety and well-being.

  • Analysis of the number of people registered to vote, including comparisons over time and between the UK constituent countries.

  • Life expectancy and the impact of factors such as occupation, illness and drug misuse. We collect these statistics from registrations and surveys.

  • The composition of households, including those who live alone, overcrowding and under-occupation, as well as internet and social media usage by household.

  • Property price, private rent and household survey and census statistics, used by government and other organisations for the creation and fulfilment of housing policy in the UK.

  • Visits and visitors to the UK, the reasons for visiting and the amount of money they spent here. Also UK residents travelling abroad, their reasons for travel and the amount of money they spent. The statistics on UK residents travelling abroad are an informal indicator of living standards.

  • Income and earnings, spending and saving, and wealth and debt. These statistics help build a picture of how living standards and inequality have changed.

  • Size, age, gender and geographic distribution of the UK population, and changes in the UK population and the factors driving these changes. These statistics have a wide range of uses. Central government, local government and the health sector use them for planning, resource allocation and managing the economy. They are also used by people such as market researchers and academics.

  • Societal and personal well-being in the UK looking beyond what we produce, to areas such as health, relationships, education and skills, what we do, where we live, our finances and the environment. This data comes from a variety of sources and much of the analysis is new.