Skip to content

Video Summary: Disability in England and Wales, 2011

Released: 30 January 2013

Also in this release

Transcript – Disability in England and Wales

This is a short video looking at disability in England and Wales.

On the 2011 Census, there was a question asking ‘Are your day-to-day activities limited because of a health problem or disability which has lasted, or is expected to last, at least 12 months?’ Using these people, we will look at the responses. In England and Wales, approximately 5 million people, or 9 per cent of the population, said that their day-to-day activities were limited a lot. A further 9 per cent reported that their activities were limited a little. 46 million people, or 82 per cent of the population, said that their activities were not limited.

Now we will look at activity limitation across the English regions and Wales. Wales had the highest proportion of people who said that their day-to-day activities were limited a lot or limited a little at 23 per cent, followed by the North East at 22 per cent. London at 14 per cent had the lowest proportion of people who said that their day-to-day activities were limited a lot or limited a little. This is likely to be due to its younger population. More than three-quarters of people in all English regions and Wales said that they have no day-to-day activity limitations.

Finally, we will look at the local areas with the highest proportion of people who said that their day-to-day activities were limited a lot or limited a little. In Wales, Neath Port Talbot had the highest proportion at 28 per cent. This was followed by Blaenau Gwent and Merthyr Tydfil at 27 per cent, Rhondda Cynon Taf at 26 per cent, and Carmarthenshire at 25 per cent. In England, the areas with the highest proportion were East Lindsey, Blackpool and Tendring at 26 per cent, and Bolsover and Barrow-in-Furness at 25 per cent. The areas with the lowest proportions of people who said that their day-to-day activities were limited a lot or limited a little were mainly concentrated in London, the South East and East of England.

Source: Office for National Statistics

Background notes

  1. This video accompanies the Disability in England and Wales, 2011 analysis.
  2. Details of the policy governing the release of new data are available by visiting www.statisticsauthority.gov.uk/assessment/code-of-practice/index.html or from the Media Relations Office email: media.relations@ons.gsi.gov.uk

    These National Statistics are produced to high professional standards and released according to the arrangements approved by the UK Statistics Authority.

Content from the Office for National Statistics.
© Crown Copyright applies unless otherwise stated.