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Measuring National Well-being: Life in the UK, 2014 This product is designated as National Statistics

Released: 18 March 2014 Download PDF

Abstract

Measuring National Well-being: Life in the UK, 2014 provides the latest overview of well-being in the UK today. A snapshot of well-being is provided across the 10 domains of well-being (for example, 'Health', 'Where we live', 'What we do'); together with a brief overview of international comparisons. The report is the second summary of life in the UK to be delivered by the Measuring National Well-being programme and will be updated annually.

Introduction

The Measuring National Well-being programme began in November 2010 with the aim to ‘develop and publish an accepted and trusted set of National Statistics which help people understand and monitor well-being’.  

The Programme has developed a set of 41 headline measures, organised by ten ‘domains’ including topics such as 'Health', 'What we do' and 'Where we live'. The measures include both objective data (for example, number of crimes against the person per 1,000 adults) and subjective data (for example, percentage who felt safe walking alone after dark). Measures are updated with latest data in March and September each year. The 'Life in the UK' report accompanies the March update and takes a closer look at measures within each domain.   

This report summarises well-being in each of the ten domains. Latest data are provided for each measure, with more detailed commentary focused on one measure per domain. The final section provides an overview of European comparability.

Where possible, data are presented for the UK. Where this is not the case, the best available geography is used. Data are the latest available at February 2014.

Feedback is welcome at nationalwell-being@ons.gov.uk

Also released today

Overview

In May 2013, the Measuring National Well-being programme highlighted that the factors most strongly associated with personal well-being are self-reported health (which had the strongest association), employment status and relationship status1. The 'Life in the UK 2014' report shows that since 2010 the proportion satisfied with their health has fallen (from 68.3% in 2009/10 to 58.6% in 2011/12), a smaller proportion of the economically active are unemployed (7.2% in October to December 2013 down from 7.8% in October to December 2010) and most have someone to rely on in a crisis (87.0% in 2010/11).

The Measuring National Well-being national debate highlighted a range of other things that ‘mattered’, for example, economic security and job satisfaction, work-life balance, education and training, and local and natural environment.

Life in the UK 2014 shows that the majority (77.0%) were satisfied with their lives in the UK in 2012/13, an increase from 75.9% in 2011/12.

In 2011–12 median household income in Great Britain was £23,208. Between 2010/11 and 2011/12 the proportion in the UK satisfied with their income fell (from 57.3% to 52.9%) and around 1 in 10 (10.9% in 2011/12) reported finding it difficult to get by financially. Over the same period, the proportion satisfied with their job remained around 77% while the proportion satisfied with the amount of leisure time fell from 60.9% to 58.8%.

In England the proportion engaging with the arts or cultural activities remained at around 8 in 10 (83.2% in 2012/13) and participation in sport at 35.7% in 2012–13. The proportion volunteering more than once in the last 12 months in the UK in 2010/11 was 16.7%.

In the UK in 2011/12, around 6 in 10 (59%) had 5 or more GCSEs Grade A* to C including English and Maths and in 2013 nearly 1 in 10 (9.3%) had no formal educational qualifications. Human Capital – which is the value of individuals, skills, knowledge and competences in the labour market fell between 2011 and 2012 from £18.0 trillion to £17.9 trillion.

The number of crimes against the person in England and Wales - fell between 2011/12 and 2012/13 (from 83 to 76 per 1,000 adults) and in 2011/12, fewer of us (62.9%) in the UK felt a sense of belonging to our neighbourhood, compared with 66.0% in 2009/10. The proportion of household waste recycled in England remained at around 43% between 2011/12 and 2012/13 but this represents a large growth since 2000/01 where only 11.2% was recycled.

The proportion who trust in Government was 1 in 4 (24%) in the UK in Autumn 2013. Voter turnout in UK general elections, though higher in 1950, has remained at around 6 in 10 for the last two General Elections (61.1% in 2010). 

Internationally, the report shows that the UK ranks above the EU average in areas such as life satisfaction, recycling rates, trust in Government and satisfaction with accommodation. The UK are below the EU average in households making ends meet, perceived health status, and support if needed advice about a serious personal or family matter.

The Commission on the Measurement of Economic Performance and Social Progress (Stiglitz, Sen, Fitoussi, 2009)2 stimulated interest in well-being and highlighted the need to acknowledge that people value things differently. In keeping with this, the priority or weight placed on any one measure or domain, or ‘what matters’ and what this means for UK well-being overall has not been included at this stage. The Measuring National Well-being programme is developing methods to aid users to interpret changes to National Well-being.
 

Notes for Overview

  1. Measuring National Well-being - What matters most to Personal Well-being?
  2. www.stiglitz-sen-fitoussi.fr/en/index.htm

Key points

Life satisfaction

  • In the UK, 77.0% adults aged 16 and over rated their life satisfaction as 7 or more out of 10 in 2012/13, an increase from 75.9% in 2011/12.

  • In 2012/13 the average rating of life satisfaction by UK adults aged 16 and over was 7.5 out of 10, with the lowest average rating in the 45 to 54 age group (7.1 out of 10) and the highest in the 16 to 19 and 65 to 79 age groups (both 7.8 out of 10).

Someone to rely on

  • In the UK, 87% of adults aged 16 and over in 2010/11 had a spouse, family member or friend to rely on if they have a serious problem.

  • In the UK in 2010/11 those aged 65 to 74 had the highest proportion with a spouse, family member or friend to rely on if they have a serious problem (92.3%) and those aged 16–24 had the lowest proportion (82.2%).

Satisfaction with health

  • In the UK, 58.6% of adults aged 16 and over were somewhat, mostly or completely satisfied with their general health in 2011/12, a decrease from 65.6% in 2010/11 and 68.3% in 2009/10.

  • In the UK in 2011/12 those aged 45 to 54 were most likely to report dissatisfaction with their general health (38.3%), a higher proportion than all older age groups - 55 to 64 (37.3%), 65 to 74 (33.3 %) and 75 and over (35.1%).

Volunteering

  • In the UK, 16.7% of people aged 16 and over volunteered more than once in the 12 months prior to interview in 2010/11.

  • Among the UK countries in 2010/11 England had the highest proportion who volunteered more than once in the last 12 months (17.0%) and Wales had the lowest (13.3%).

Satisfaction with accommodation

  • 91.2% were very or fairly satisfied with their accommodation in England in 2011–12, an increase from 90.8% in 2010–11 and 90.2% in 2008–09.

  • In England in 2011–12 owner occupiers were most satisfied with their accommodation at 95.7%, compared with 83.1% of private renters and 80.7% of all social renters.

Getting by financially

  • In the UK, 10.9% of people found it very or quite difficult to get by financially in 2011/12, a decrease from 11.6% in 2010/11 and 12.3% in 2009/10.

  • In the UK in 2011/12, those aged 25 to 44 were more likely to report finding it very or quite difficult to get by financially (14.6%), while those aged 75 were least likely (2.7%).

Real Net National Income per head

  • Real National Net income per head was £20,725 in the UK in 2012, a decrease of £747 from £21,472 in 2011.

No educational qualifications

  • The proportion of UK residents aged 16–64 who had no educational qualification in 2013 was 9.3%, an increase from 2012 (9.2%) and an overall decrease from 2008 (13.1%).

  • Among the UK countries in 2012–2013, England had the lowest proportion with no qualifications (9.2%) and Northern Ireland had the highest (17.3%) in 2013.

Trust in government

  • In the UK, 24% of people aged 15 and over reported that they ‘tended to trust’ the government in the autumn of 2013 – an increase from 22% in spring 2013 and a decrease from 25% in Autumn 2012.

Recycling

  • In England, 43.2% of household waste was recycled in 2012/13 – an increase from 43.0% in 2011/12 and 11.2% in 2000/01.

European comparisons

  • Over 6 in 10 people (62.7%) aged 16 and over in the UK rated their health status as very good or good, just behind the EU–28 average of 64.0% in 2011.

  • Just over 8 in 10 (80.2%) of people aged 16 and over in the UK rated their satisfaction with their accommodation as 7 or more out of 10, higher than the EU–28 average of 76.9% in 2011.

Next steps

The Measuring National Well-being programme will continue to develop and deliver a suite of outputs covering well-being across the economy, society and the environment. Upcoming development work includes:

  • Analysis of inequalities in personal well-being.

  • Continued work to assess change in measures of national well-being.

  • Report on international comparisons of well-being.

  • Report on economic well-being.

  • Development of Natural Capital Statistics.

  • Development of household satellite accounts including transport and housing.

  • Estimates of Human Capital.

Personal well-being

Domain overview and importance

Personal (or subjective) well-being concerns peoples’ self-reported assessment of their own well-being, for example, by asking about their life satisfaction, happiness, and psychological wellbeing.

The importance of measuring subjective well-being has gained momentum internationally. The report of the Commission for the Measurement of Economic Performance and Social Progress stated in 2009 that ‘it is possible to collect meaningful and reliable data on subjective as well as objective well-being. Subjective well-being encompasses different aspects (cognitive evaluations of one’s life, happiness, satisfaction, positive emotions such as joy and pride, and negative emotions such as pain and worry).

 

Table 1: Measures included in the ‘Personal well-being’ domain

United Kingdom

  2011/12 2012/13
Medium/high (7 to 10 out of 10) rating of satisfaction with their lives overall1 75.9% 77.0%
Source: Annual Population Survey, Office for National Statistics
  2011/12 2012/13
Medium/high (7 to 10 out of 10) rating of how worthwhile the things they do are1 80.0% 80.7%
Source: Annual Population Survey, Office for National Statistics
  2011/12 2012/13
Rated their happiness yesterday as medium/high (7 to 10 out of 10)1 71.1% 71.6%
Source: Annual Population Survey, Office for National Statistics
  2011/12 2012/13
Rated their anxiety yesterday as low (0 to 3 out of 10)1 60.1% 61.5%
Source: Annual Population Survey, Office for National Statistics
  2008 2009/10
Population mental well-being (average rating out of 35) 24.3 25.2
Source: Understanding Society, the UK Household Longitudinal Study    

Table notes:

  1. Adults aged 16 and over were asked 'Overall, how satisfied are you with your life nowadays?', 'Overall, to what extent do you feel the things you do in your life are worthwhile?', 'Overall, how happy did you feel yesterday?' and 'Overall, how anxious did you feel yesterday?' where 0 is 'not at all' and 10 is 'completely'.

Download table

The full list of 41 National Well-being measures is available in various formats: an Excel file with time series data, an interactive wheel of measures which includes time series charts, and a PDF ‘print and keep’ version showing the latest data. Interactive graphs are also available showing selected measures by region and country. All are available at www.ons.gov.uk/well-being

Focus on ‘Life satisfaction’ 

Why this measure?

Life satisfaction measures how people evaluate their life as a whole rather than their current feelings. It captures a reflective assessment of which life circumstances and conditions are important for personal well-being.

Has it changed over time?

Between 2011/12 and 2012/13 there was an overall improvement in life satisfaction. The proportion of people rating their life satisfaction as 7 or more out of 10 rose from 75.9% to 77.0%. Over the same period there was a decrease in people rating their life satisfaction as 4 or less out of 10. This fell from 6.6% to 5.8%.

Breakdown by distribution of responses

    

Figure 1: Distribution of responses for life satisfaction (1), 2012/13

United Kingdom

Distribution of responses from 0 to 10 for life satisfaction in 2012/13
Source: Annual Population Survey (APS) - Office for National Statistics

Notes:

  1. Adults aged 16 and over were asked 'Overall, how satisfied are you with your life nowadays?' where 0 is 'not at all' and 10 is 'completely'. All data is weighted. Non-respondents are not included.

Download chart

Additional breakdowns

In 2012/13:

  • The average rating of life satisfaction for all adults aged 16 and over was 7.5 out of 10. 

  • On average, women have higher life satisfaction than men (7.5 and 7.4 out of 10 respectively).

  • People aged 16 to 19 and 65 to 79 rated their life satisfaction higher than any other age group at 7.8 out of 10.

  • People aged 45 to 54 rated their life satisfaction lower than any other age at 7.1 out of 10.

  • The White and Indian respondents are on average the most satisfied with their lives (7.5 out of 10) while the Black/African/Caribbean/Black British respondents are the least satisfied (6.9 out of 10). 

  • Northern Ireland had proportionately more people than any other country in the UK rating their life satisfaction as very high (9 or 10 out of 10) (33.1%).

  • Wales had proportionately more people than any other country in the UK rating their life satisfaction as very low (0-4 out of 10) (6.7%).

  • Among the English regions, the South West had the highest proportions of people giving the highest ratings of 9 or 10 out of 10 for life satisfaction (27.9%).

  • Among the English regions, the North East had proportionately more people who rated their life satisfaction as 4 or less out of 10 (7.0%).

Our relationships

Domain overview and importance

The amount and quality of social connections with people around us are an essential part of our well-being. This was highlighted in the Office for National Statistics National Debate on Measuring National Well-being. When people were asked what mattered most for the measurement of National Well-being, nearly 9 in 10 (89%) reported ‘having good connections with friends and relatives’.

Table 2: Measures included in the 'Our relationships' domain

United Kingdom

  2003 2007 2011
Average rating of satisfaction with family life (average rating out of 10) 7.9 8.2 8.2
Source: Eurofound, European Quality of Life Survey 
  2003 2007 2011
Average rating of satisfaction with social life  (average rating out of 10) 7.0 8.0 7.0
Source: Eurofound, European Quality of Life Survey 
      2010/11
Has a spouse, family member or friend to rely on if they have a serious problem     87.0%
Source: Understanding Society, the UK Household Longitudinal Study      

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The full list of 41 National Well-being measures is available in various formats: an Excel file with time series data, an interactive wheel of measures which includes time series charts, and a PDF ‘print and keep’ version showing the latest data. Interactive graphs are also available showing selected measures by region and country. All are available at www.ons.gov.uk/well-being

Focus on ‘Have a spouse, family member or friend to rely on if they have a serious problem’

Why this measure?

Social relationships with family and friends are an important part of life which in turn may affect individual well-being.

‘Social connections, including marriage, of course, but not limited to that, are among the most robust correlates of subjective well-being. People who have close friends and confidants, friendly neighbours and supportive co-workers are less likely to experience sadness, loneliness, low self-esteem and problems with eating and sleeping’, Helliwell and Putnam, 2004.

Breakdown by age

Figure 2: Percentage of people that have a spouse, family member or friend to rely on if they have a serious problem (1): by age 2010/11

United Kingdom

The Percentage of people by age group that have a spouse, family member or friend to rely on if they have a serious problem in 2010/11

Notes:

  1. Respondents aged 16 and over were asked 'Do you have a spouse, family member or friend to rely on if you have a serious problem?'

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In the UK in 2010/11, just over 9 in 10 people (92.3%) aged 65 to 74 had a spouse, family member or friend to rely on if they had a serious problem. This compared with just over 8 in 10 (82.2%) of those aged 16 to 24.

Additional breakdowns

In 2010/11:

  • 85.9% of men and 88.0% of women aged 16 and over had a spouse, family member or friend to rely on if they had a serious problem.

  • Among the UK countries, 88.5% of people aged 16 and over had a spouse, family member or friend to rely on if they had a serious problem compared with 86.9% in England, 86.8% in Northern Ireland and 86.2% in Wales.

  • Among the English regions, 82.7% of people aged 16 and over in London had a spouse, family member or friend to rely on if they had a serious problem, compared with 88.5% in the South West.

Health

Domain overview and importance

When people were asked what mattered most for the measurement of National Well-being, in the Office for National Statistics National Debate on Measuring National Well-being, ‘Health’ was the most common response with 89% of respondents.

The World Health Organisation defines health as ‘a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity’.

Table 3: Measures included in the 'Health' domain

United Kingdom

  2000–02 2005–07 2008–10
Healthy life expectancy at birth (male) 60.7 61.4 63.5
Healthy life expectancy at birth (female) 62.4 62.9 65.7
Source: Office for National Statistics
  Jan to Mar 2000 Jan to Mar 2012 Jan to Mar 2013
Reported a long term illness and a disability 18.5% 20.0% 19.7%
Source: Labour Force Survey, Office for National Statistics
  2009/10 2010/11 2011/12
Somewhat, mostly or completely satisfied with their health 68.3% 65.6% 58.6%
Source: Understanding Society, the UK Household Longitudinal Study
  2009/10 2010/11 2011/12
Some evidence indicating probable psychological disturbance or mental ill health 18.0% 18.4% 18.6%
Source: Understanding Society, the UK Household Longitudinal Study      

Download table

The full list of 41 National Well-being measures is available in various formats: an Excel file with time series data, an interactive wheel of measures which includes time series charts, and a PDF ‘print and keep’ version showing the latest data. Interactive graphs are also available showing selected measures by region and country. All are available at www.ons.gov.uk/well-being

Focus on ‘Satisfaction with health’

Why this measure?

People’s own assessment of their health is associated with their assessment of their overall life satisfaction.

‘How people view their health was the most important factor related to personal well-being... People who reported very bad health had much lower ratings of life satisfaction, feelings that things were worthwhile, levels of happiness and higher ratings of anxiety on average than those who said their health was good’, What matters most to personal well-being? Office for National Statistics, 2013.

Has it changed over time?

Between 2009/10 and 2011/12, people aged 16 and over in the UK who reported that they were somewhat, mostly or completely satisfied with their health had fallen by 9.7 percentage points from 68.3% to 58.6%. The proportion of people that reported that they were mostly dissatisfied with their health more than doubled from 6.3% to 13.5% over the same period.

Breakdown by age

Figure 3: Satisfaction with health (1): by age, 2011–12

United Kingdom

Percentage who were satisfied and dissatisfied with their health by age in 2011–12

Notes:

  1. Those who reported that they were either 'somewhat, mostly or completely satisfied' or 'somewhat, mostly or completely dissatisfied' with their general health. This chart does not include those who were neither satisfied nor dissatisfied.

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Satisfaction with health varied by age group in the UK. Two-thirds (66.1%) of people aged 16 to 24 reported that they were somewhat, mostly or completely satisfied with their general health in 2011–12. This compares with 54.7% of those aged 45 to 54, 55.0% of those aged aged 55 to 64 and 53.7% of those aged 75 and over. Those aged 45 to 54 and 55 to 64 were more likely to have reported that they were somewhat, mostly or completely dissatisfied with their general health at 38.3% and 37.3% respectively.

Additional breakdowns

In 2011/12:

  • Around 6 in 10 men and women aged 16 and over that reported they were somewhat, mostly or completely satisfied with their general health at 60.0% and 57.4% respectively.

  • Among the UK countries, people aged 16 and over in Northern Ireland were more likely to be somewhat, mostly or completely satisfied with their general health at 62.4%. This compares to 58.9% in England, 57.0% in Scotland and 55.4% in Wales.

What we do

Domain overview and importance

Across the UK people live many different lifestyles based on individual choices, characteristics, personal preferences and circumstances. Individuals divide their time between various tasks and activities, including paid or unpaid employment, volunteering and various leisure activities. What we do in life shapes our lifestyles, our relationships with others and our overall well-being.

Table 4: Measures included in the 'What we do' domain

United Kingdom (unless specified)

  Oct-Dec 2010 Oct-Dec 2012 Oct-Dec 2013
Unemployment rate 7.8% 7.8% 7.2%
Source: Labour Force Survey, Office for National Statistics
  2009/10 2010/11 2011/12
Somewhat, mostly or completely satisfied with their job 77.8% 78.5% 77.3%
Source: Understanding Society, the UK Household Longitudinal Study
  2009/10 2010/11 2011/12
Somewhat, mostly or completely satisfied with their amount of leisure time 62.3% 60.9% 58.8%
Source: Understanding Society, the UK Household Longitudinal Study
      2010/11
Volunteered more than once in the last 12 months 16.7%
Source: Understanding Society, the UK Household Longitudinal Study
  2008/09 2011/12 2012/13
Engaged with/participated in arts or cultural activity at least 3 times in last year (England) 80.8% 83.9% 83.2%
Source: Department for Culture, Media and Sport
  2005-06 2011–12 2012–13
Adult participation in 30 minutes of moderate intensity sport, once per week (England) 34.2% 36.0% 35.7%
Source: Sport England      

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The full list of 41 National Well-being measures is available in various formats: an Excel file with time series data, an interactive wheel of measures which includes time series charts, and a PDF ‘print and keep’ version showing the latest data. Interactive graphs are also available showing selected measures by region and country. All are available at www.ons.gov.uk/well-being

Focus on ‘Volunteered more than once in the last 12 months’ 

Why this measure?

Volunteering may have benefits for both health and well-being and can make a difference to the lives of other people, the community or the environment.

‘Volunteering is vital to charities and civil society, helps to strengthen local communities, and improves the wellbeing of individuals who participate’ - Daniel Fujiwara, Paul Oroyemi and Ewen McKinnon, Wellbeing and Civil Society.

Breakdown by UK country and region

In 2010/11, 16.7% of people aged 16 and over in the UK did some sort of unpaid help or worked as a volunteer for an organisation or charity more than once in the 12 months prior to interview. In England 17.0% of people volunteered more than once a year compared to 15.7% in Scotland, 15.6% in Northern Ireland and 13.3% in Wales.

Figure 4: Volunteering more than once in the last 12 months (1): by UK country and region, 2010/11

United Kingdom

Percentage who volunteer more than once in the last 12 months by UK country and region in 2010/11

Notes:

  1. Respondents who had in the last 12 months, given any unpaid help or worked as a volunteer for any type of local, national or international organisation or charity were asked 'Including any time spent at home or elsewhere, about how often over the last 12 months have you generally done something to help any of these organisations?' The chart includes those who volunteered more than once a in the year prior to interview as a proportion of all adults and does not include those who stated a one-off activity or those who helped or worked on a seasonal basis.

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Among the English regions, a higher proportion of people living in the South East (22.0%), the South West (19.7%) and the East of England (18.2%) volunteered more than once a year. People living in the North East were less likely to volunteer (12.3%).

Additional breakdowns

In 2010/11:

  • Nearly 1 in 10 (9.0%) people aged 16 and over volunteered at least once a week, while 3.4% volunteered at least once a month.

  • Women were more likely than men to volunteer more than once a year (17.6% and 15.6% respectively).

  • Those aged 65 to 74 were more likely to volunteer more than once a year (22.3%), while those aged 25 to 44 were less likely (14.1%).

Where we live

Domain overview and importance

Where we live can have a significant impact on our sense of well-being. Homes which meet our individual needs and provide us with shelter and security are made all the better by having easy access to local shops and services, and safe and green spaces to walk or play in, which in turn can help people to live healthier and happier lives.

Table 5: Measures included in the 'Where we live' domain

United Kingdom (unless specified)

  2003/04 2011/12 2012/13
Crimes against the person (per 1,000 adults) (England and Wales) 107 83 76
Source: Crime Survey for England and Wales, Office for National Statistics
  2009/10 2011/12 2012/13
Accessed natural environment at least once a week in the last 12 months (England) 54% 55% 55%
Source: Natural England
    2009/10 2011/12
Agreed/agreed strongly they felt they belonged to their neighbourhood 66.0% 62.9%
Source: Understanding Society, the UK Household Longitudinal Study
  2006/07 2011/12 2012/13
Felt fairly/very safe walking alone after dark (men)  82.9% 87.0% 84.8%
Felt fairly/very safe walking alone after dark (women)  56.0% 64.6% 56.8%
Source: Crime Survey for England and Wales, Office for National Statistics
  2007 2010 2011
Households with good transport access to key services or work (2010 = 100) (England) 110 100 97
Source: Department for Transport
  2008–09 2010–11 2011–12
Satisfaction with accommodation (England) 90.2% 90.8% 91.2%
Source: Department for Communities and Local Government      

Download table


The full list of 41 National Well-being measures is available in various formats: an Excel file with time series data, an interactive wheel of measures which includes time series charts, and a PDF ‘print and keep’ version showing the latest data. Interactive graphs are also available showing selected measures by region and country. All are available at www.ons.gov.uk/well-being

Focus on ‘Satisfaction with accommodation’ 

Why this measure?

Satisfaction with our accommodation is important. Our homes are a place of refuge, entertainment and relaxation.

Shelter stated in their response to the Office for National Statistics consultation ‘Proposed Domains and Headline Indicators for Measuring National Wellbeing’ ‘Housing is a key component of well-being... it is also linked to every aspect that has been identified by the ONS as key to measuring national well-being’.

Has it changed over time?

This measure has not changed significantly over the last four years, with the proportion of households that are satisfied with their accommodation being consistently high at around 90% to 91%.

Breakdown by tenure

Figure 5: Satisfaction with accommodation (1): by tenure, 2011–12

England

Percentage of thoes by tenure group who were satisfied, dissatisfied or neither satisfied or dissatisfied with their accommodation in 2011–12
Source: English Housing Survey - Communities and Local Government

Notes:

  1. Households were asked to rate their levels of satisfaction with their accommodation using a five-point scale where 1 = very satisfied and 5 = very dissatisfied.

Download chart

In 2011–12, dissatisfaction with accommodation was more likely among households that rented. Local authority renters were the most likely to be dissatisfied (13.6%), followed by housing association renters (10.7%) and private renters (10.0%). Just 2.4% of owner occupiers were dissatisfied with their accommodation. Conversely, owner occupiers were most satisfied with their accommodation at 95.7%, compared with 83.1% of private renters and 80.7% of all social renters. However it must be noted that social renters reported on the English Housing Survey that there were more problems in their local area than other tenures, which may influence their overall satisfaction with the accommodation.

Additional breakdowns

In 2011–12:

  • Older people are more likely to be satisfied with their accommodation. For example, 97.1% of people (household reference person1) aged 75 and over were satisfied with their accommodation compared to 79.7% of those aged 16 to 24.

  • Satisfaction with accommodation varied by the ethnic group of the household reference person1 from 74.1% of those in the black ethnic group to 88.4% in the Indian ethnic group to 92.3% in the white ethnic group in 2011–12. 

  • Satisfaction varied by household type with 94.7% of couples with no dependent children satisfied with their accommodation compared with 88.8% of couple households with dependent children.

 

Notes for Where we live

  1. Household reference person (HRP): The person in whose name the dwelling is owned or rented or who is otherwise responsible for the accommodation. In the case of joint owners and tenants, the person with the highest income is taken as the HRP. Where incomes are equal, the older is taken as the HRP. This procedure increases the likelihood that the HRP better characterises the household’s social and economic position. The English Housing Survey definition of HRP is not consistent with the Census 2011, in which the HRP is chosen on basis of their economic activity. Where economic activity is the same, the older is taken as HRP, or if they are the same age, HRP is the first listed on the questionnaire.

Personal finance

Domain overview and importance

Personal finance refers to individuals and household consumption possibilities, both now and in the future, and is therefore driven by both income and wealth. It can have a significant impact on people's sense of well-being and the financial situation of the population is an important aspect of national well-being.

Table 6: Measures included in the 'Personal finance' domain

United Kingdom (unless specified)

  2002/03 2010/11 2011/12
Individuals in households with less than 60% of median income after housing costs 22% 21% 21%
Source: Department for Work and Pensions 
    2006/08 2008/10
Median wealth per household, including pension wealth (Great Britain) £210,300 £232,400
Source: Wealth and Assets Survey, Office for National Statistics
  2002–03 2010–11 2011–12
Median household income £17,829 £22,671 £23,208
Source: Office for National Statistics
  2009/10 2010/11 2011/12
Somewhat, mostly or completely satisfied with the income of their household 57.2% 57.3% 52.9%
Source: Understanding Society, the UK Household Longitudinal Study
  2009/10 2010/11 2011/12
Report finding it quite or very difficult to get by financially 12.3% 11.6% 10.9%
Source: Understanding Society, the UK Household Longitudinal Study

Download table

The full list of 41 National Well-being measures is available in various formats: an Excel file with time series data, an interactive wheel of measures which includes time series charts, and a PDF ‘print and keep’ version showing the latest data. Interactive graphs are also available showing selected measures by region and country. All are available at www.ons.gov.uk/well-being

Focus on ‘Finding it quite or very difficult to get by financially’

Why this measure?

To have the financial means to comfortably attain a gratifying lifestyle is an important factor to many people’s sense of well-being.

‘Economic resources enhance people’s freedom to choose the lives that they want to live and protect them against economic and personal risks’ How's Life? 2013: Measuring Well-being, OECD.

Has it changed over time?

The proportion of people aged 16 and over in the UK who reported that they were finding it quite or very difficult to get by financially fell from 12.3% in 2009/10 to 10.9% in 2011/12. The proportion of people that reported that they were ‘doing alright’ increased from 32.9% to 34.9% over the same period.

Breakdown by age-group

Figure 6: Finding personal financial situation quite or very difficult: by age group (1), 2011/12

United Kingdom

Percenatge of people finding their financial situation quite or very difficult, by age group in 2011/12

Notes:

  1. Respondents were asked how well they were managing financially these days with responses ‘living comfortably, doing alright, just about getting by, finding it quite difficult or finding it very difficult'.

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In 2011/12, 10.9% of those aged 16 and over in the UK reported that they were finding their financial situation quite or very difficult. The proportion finding their financial situation quite or very difficult varied considerably between the age groups. A higher percentage of those aged 16 to 24 (11.4%), 25 to 44 (14.6%) and 45 to 54 (14.1%) reported finding their financial situation quite or very difficult than the average for all aged 16 and over. For those aged 55 and above, a smaller proportion of each age group reported that they were finding their financial situation quite or very difficult, with the lowest proportion among those aged 75 and over (2.7%). 

Additional breakdowns

In 2011/12:

  • 10.5% of men reported finding their financial situation quite or very difficult compared with 11.3% of women.

  • 11.0% of people aged 16 and over living in England reported finding their financial situation quite or very difficult. This compares with 10.5% in Scotland, 10.4% in Wales and 9.6% in Northern Ireland.

  • Across the English regions, the proportion of people aged 16 and over who reported finding their financial situation quite or very difficult was highest in London (14.6%) and lowest in East Midlands (9.6%) and the North West (9.8%).

Economy

Domain overview and importance

The economy is the set of activities related to the production and distribution of goods and services. Its performance will impact everyone financially and has a direct role in people’s material conditions, for example, housing, wealth, jobs and earnings.

 

Table 7: Measures included in the 'Economy' domain

United Kingdom

2002 2011 2012
Real net national income per head £20,347 £21,472 £20,725
Source: Office for National Statistics
2002/03 2011/12 2012/13
UK public sector net debt as a percentage of Gross Domestic Product 31.4% 70.9% 73.8%
Source: Office for National Statistics
Jan 2012 Jan 2013 Jan 2014
Inflation rate (as measured by the Consumer Price Index) 3.6% 2.7% 1.9%
Source: Office for National Statistics

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The full list of 41 National Well-being measures is available in various formats: an Excel file with time series data, an interactive wheel of measures which includes time series charts, and a PDF ‘print and keep’ version showing the latest data. Interactive graphs are also available showing selected measures by region and country. All are available at www.ons.gov.uk/well-being

Focus on ‘Real net national income per head’ 

Why this measure?

‘Material living standards are more closely associated with measures of NNI and consumption than with GDP’ (Stiglitz, Sen and Fitoussi, 2009).

Gross Domestic Product (GDP) is often used for judging how well an economy is doing, however, it was not designed as a measure of individual or national well-being. Living standards are more closely aligned with net national income (NNI) (the total income available to residents of that country) as GDP can grow at the same time as incomes decreases and vice versa. For example, multinational firms can produce goods and services in the UK contributing to GDP, but then repatriate some or all of the profits back to their home country.  Equally, individuals could work in the UK (contributing to GDP) but live in another country (this is more common in countries that share land boarders). In both of these cases, there is a contribution to GDP but the income is not available to residents of the UK. NNI takes account of these flows of income between countries (amongst other differences) and therefore better represents the total income available to residents of a country. 

Has it changed over time?

Figure 7: Real net national income per head (1)

United Kingdom

 Real net national income per head between 2002 and 2012
Source: Office for National Statistics

Notes:

  1. 2010 prices.

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Prior to the recession that started in 2008, real Net National Income (NNI) per head grew steadily from £20,347 in 2002 to £23,253 in 2007. During 2008 and 2009, NNI per head fell to £23,125 and £21,380 respectively. In 2010 and 2011 NNI per head remained broadly unchanged at £21,408 and £21,472, before falling again in 2012 to £20,725. 

Notes for Economy

  1. These are examples of the difference between GDP and NNI, for a full description of the differences refer to Measuring National Well-being: The Economy 2012 Measuring National Well-being - The Economy.

Education and skills

Domain overview and importance

‘Learning encourages social interaction and increases self-esteem and feelings of competency. Behaviour directed by personal goals to achieve something new has been shown to increase reported life satisfaction’, New Economics Foundation 2009.

When people were asked what mattered most for the measurement of National Well-being, in the Office for National Statistics National Debate on Measuring National Well-being, nearly 7 in 10 people (69%) said ‘Education and skills’ were important.

Table 8: Measure included in the ' Education and skills' domain

United Kingdom

  2001 2011 2012
Human capital - the value of individuals' skills, knowledge and competences in labour market (£ trillion -figures in 2010 prices) 14.46 18.00 17.90
Source: Office for National Statistics
  2008/09 2010/11 2011/12
Five or more GCSEs A* to C including English and Maths 49.8% 58.5% 59.0%
Source: Department for Education; Welsh Government; Scottish Government; Northern Ireland Department of Education 
  2008 2012 2013
UK residents aged 16 to 64 with no qualifications 13.1% 9.2% 9.3%
Source: Labour Force Survey, Office for National Statistics      

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The full list of 41 National Well-being measures is available in various formats: an Excel file with time series data, an interactive wheel of measures which includes time series charts, and a PDF ‘print and keep’ version showing the latest data. Interactive graphs are also available showing selected measures by region and country. All are available at www.ons.gov.uk/well-being

Focus on ‘UK residents aged 16 to 64 with no qualifications’ 

Why this measure?

People with qualifications may have a higher chance of securing employment or continuing their education through higher education establishments such as universities than those without any qualifications.

‘Educational attainment not only affects employability, but also has an impact on income from employment’, Education at a Glance 2013: OECD Indicators.

'Learning was associated with higher wellbeing after controlling for a range of other factors. We found evidence that informal learning was associated with higher wellbeing. There was also some evidence that obtaining qualifications was also linked to higher wellbeing’, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills. Research Paper 92, Learning and Wellbeing Trajectories among Older Adults in England, November 2012.

Has it changed over time?

Figure 8: Percentage of UK residents aged 16 to 64 with no qualifications (1)

United Kingdom

Percentage of UK residents aged 16 to 64 with no qualifications from 2002 to 2013
Source: Labour Force Survey - Office for National Statistics

Notes:

  1. Men aged 16-64 and women aged 16-59 between 2002 and 2007 and men and women aged 16 to 64 from 2008 onwards.

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The proportion of people in the UK with no educational qualifications has been falling since 2002. In 2002, 15.7% of UK residents had no qualifications, by 2007 this had fallen to 13.0%. In 2013 under 1 in 10 (9.3%) reported that they had no educational qualifications, 6.4 percentage points lower than in 2002.

Breakdown by region

Figure 9: Percentage of UK residents aged 16 to 64 with no qualifications: by region, 2012–13 (1)

United Kingdom

 Percentage of UK residents aged 16 to 64 with no qualifications, by region in 2012–13
Source: Annual Population Survey (APS) - Office for National Statistics

Notes:

  1. Data is for October 2012 to September 2013.

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Just under 1 in 10 residents (9.2%) aged 16 to 64 in England had no educational qualifications in 2012–13. This compares with 10.5% in Scotland, 10.8% in Wales and 17.3% in Northern Ireland. Among the English regions the highest proportion of people aged 16 to 64 without any educational qualifications were in the West Midlands (13.6%), while the lowest proportion were in the South East (6.7%) and the South West (6.8%).

Governance

Domain overview and importance

A fundamental part of the work of government is to support a better life for its citizens and help build strong and resilient communities which in turn may improve the well-being of individuals. This was highlighted in the Office for National Statistics National Debate on Measuring National Well-being.  When people were asked what mattered most for the measurement of National Well-being, ‘Governance’ was one aspect that people considered important.

Table 9: Measures included in the 'Governance' domain

United Kingdom

Measures Autumn 2003 Spring 2013 Autumn 2013
Those who have trust in national Government 24% 22% 24%
Source: Eurobarometer
  1950 2005 2010
Voter turnout (in UK General Elections) 81.6% 58.3% 61.1%
Source: The International Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance

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The full list of 41 National Well-being measures is available in various formats: an Excel file with time series data, an interactive wheel of measures which includes time series charts, and a PDF ‘print and keep’ version showing the latest data. Interactive graphs are also available showing selected measures by region and country. All are available at www.ons.gov.uk/well-being

Focus on ‘trust in national Government’

Why this measure?

‘Citizens look to governments to lead the way. Without strong leadership, supported by effective policies, trust is easily eroded. Good governance means putting the needs of people at the centre of policy-making’, Secretary-General Angel Gurría, The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.

In the simplest sense, government accountability means that the Government is answerable for its performance or results. Much of the public's trust rests upon the Government being openly accountable for its decisions, actions and mistakes.

Has it changed over time?

Figure 10: Percentage of those who have trust in national Government (1)

United Kingdom

Percentage of UK residents that have trust in national Government from Spring 2001 to Autumn 2013

Notes:

  1. Respondents aged 15 and over were asked if they 'tend to trust' or 'tend to not trust' the UK government. Percentages are for those who answered 'tend to trust'. Fieldwork was carried out in Spring (Spr) and Autumn (Aut) of each year. Data not available for Autumn 2002.

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Nearly a quarter of people (24%) aged 15 and over in the UK reported that they ‘tended to trust’ the government in the autumn of 2013. This was a rise of two percentage points from 22% in spring 2013 and a fall of one percentage point from 25% in Autumn 2012. Between 2001 and 2013, the proportion of people who trusted in government peaked in autumn 2001 at 43% but has remained below 35% since then. In the autumn of 2009, trust in government fell to a low of just under a fifth (19%). 

Natural environment

Domain overview and importance

In the Office for National Statistics National Debate on Measuring National Well-being, 73% of respondents mentioned the environment, including local green space and nature, as an important factor in well-being. The natural environment has a role to play to ensure sustainable supply of natural goods like food, water, minerals, raw materials, and to maintain critical ecosystem services that provide benefits for human welfare.

Table 10: Measures included in the 'Natural environment' domain

United Kingdom (unless specified)

  2004 2011 2012
Energy consumed within the UK from renewable sources 1.1% 3.8% 4.2%
Source: Department for Energy and Climate Change
  2000/01 2011/12 2012/13
Household waste that is recycled (England) 11.2% 43.0% 43.2%
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs 
  1980 2012 2013
Protected areas in the UK (million hectares) 4,888 14,466 14,467
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs 
  1990 2011 2012
Total green house gas emissions (million tonnes carbon dioxide equivalent) 769.7 552.6 571.5
Source: Department for Energy and Climate Change      

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The full list of 41 National Well-being measures is available in various formats: an Excel file with time series data, an interactive wheel of measures which includes time series charts, and a PDF ‘print and keep’ version showing the latest data. Interactive graphs are also available showing selected measures by region and country. All are available at www.ons.gov.uk/well-being

Focus on ‘Household waste that is recycled’ 

Why this measure?

Recycling was the most commonly cited proposed addition to the 'Natural Environment' domain in the Office for National Statistics consultation on ‘Proposed Domains and Headline Indicators for Measuring National Wellbeing’.  The measure gives an indication of the priority that households are now giving to protecting the natural environment. It also shows how we are making best use of the natural resources and minimising the use of landfill sites.

Has it changed over time?

Figure 11: Percentage of household waste that is recycled (1)

England

Percentage of household waste recycled in England from 2000/01 to 2012/13

Notes:

  1. Includes composting and reused waste.

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Since 2000/01 there has been a steady increase in household waste that is recycled. The household waste recycling rate was 43.2% in England in 2012/13, 32 percentage points higher than in 2000/01 (11.2%) and 0.2 percentage points higher than 2011/12 (43.0%). In the last couple of years, the recycling rate has remained relatively stable, however, between 2003/04 and 2008/09 there were year on year changes of between 3.0 and 4.7 percentage points. This was mainly due to local authorities introducing and expanding their recycling collection schemes.

Breakdown by region

Figure 12: Household waste recycling rate (1): by English region, 2012/13

England

Percentage of household waste recycled by English regions in 2012/13

Notes:

  1. Includes composting and preparation for reuse.

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Among the English regions, the highest recycling rate was in the East (48.5%), while London had the lowest recycling rate (34.0%). Across the waste disposal authorities or councils in England, the highest recycling rates were in Rochford District Council (66.8%) while the lowest was in Ashford Borough Council (11.9%).
In Wales over half (52.6%) of household waste was recycled or composted in 2012/13, this compares with 36.3% in 2008/091. In Scotland 41.2% of household waste was recycled in 2012/13. The waste authority with the highest recycling rate was in Clackmannanshire (58.9%) and the lowest in the Shetland Isles (13.5%). In Northern Ireland 39.7% of household waste was recycled, with the highest recycling rate in Magherafelt (56.1%) and the lowest in Derry (26.8%).

Additional breakdowns

  • Total household waste in England in 2012/13 has fallen by 12.2% since 2006/07 to 22.6 million tonnes, amounting to 423kg per person per year. 

  • 9.8 million tonnes of waste was recycled in England in 2012/13  equivalent to 183kg per person per year.

  • About 40% of waste collected for recycling, compost and reuse in England in 2012/13 was green waste for compost.

Notes for Natural environment

  1. In Wales, 2008/09 includes household waste 'collected' for reuse, recycling or composted, 2012/13 includes household waste 'sent' for reuse, recycling or composted.

European comparisons

Overview

European data are available for seven out of ten measures of National Well-being that were focused on earlier in this article and are highlighted here. Direct comparable data is only available for one of these measures (trust in Government), therefore the remaining six measures have proxy comparisons as detailed in Table 11.

Table 11: European comparable measures

ONS Measures European comparison measures
Personal well-being
Satisfaction with their lives overall (7 or more out of 10) How satisfied would you say you are with your life these days (7 or more out of 10)
Source: Annual Population Survey, Office for National Statistics (2012/13) Source: Third European Quality of Life Survey (2011)
Our relationships
Has a spouse, family member or friend to rely on if they have a serious problem From whom would you get support if you needed advice about a serious personal or family matter? (Family member, a friend, neighbour, or someone else)
Source: Understanding Society, the UK Household Longitudinal Study (2010/11) Source: Third European Quality of Life Survey (2011)
Health
Somewhat, mostly or completely satisfied with their health Perceived health status (Very good or good)
Source: Understanding Society, the UK Household Longitudinal Study (2011/12) Source: Third European Quality of Life Survey (2011)
Where we live
Fairly/very satisfied with their accommodation Your accommodation/Could you please tell me on a scale of 1 to 10 how satisfied you are with it
Source: Department for Communities and Local Government (2011–12) Source: Third European Quality of Life Survey (2011)
Personal finance
Report finding it quite or very difficult to get by financially Households making ends meet with difficulty and great difficulty
Source: Understanding Society, the UK Household Longitudinal Study (2011/12) Eurostat (2012)
Governance
Those who have trust in national Government  Those who have trust in national Government 
Source: Eurobarometer (Autumn 2013) Source: Eurobarometer (Autumn 2013)
Natural environment
Household waste that is recycled  Municipal waste that is recycled/composted/digested
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs  (2012/13) Source: Eurostat (2011)

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Table 12 shows that of the seven measures, the UK ranked above the EU average in four of the measures and below the EU average in three of the measures. The remainder of this section will describe this in more detail and further highlight the countries that ranked highest and lowest in each of the measures.

Table 12: European comparisons summary

  UK EU average Top ranked country Bottom ranked country
Life satisfaction 71.8% 69.3% Denmark (91.0%) Bulgaria (38.3%)
Support if needed advice about a serious personal or family matter 88.7% 93.0% Slovakia (98.8%) France (86.1%)
Perceived health status 62.7% 64.0% Ireland (75.3%) Latvia/Lithuania (41.1%)
Satisfaction with accommodation 80.2% 76.9% Finland (90.9%) Latvia (55.2%)
Households making ends meet with difficulty and great difficulty 20.2% 27.7% Greece (73.1%) Sweden (6.8%)
Trust in national government 24% 23% Sweden (57%) Spain (9%)
Municipal waste that is recycled/composted/digested1 46% (est.) 41% Germany (65%) Romania (1% est.)

Table notes:

  1. 'est.' is estimated data

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Personal well-being

Life satisfaction

Figure 13: Life satisfaction (1), 2011

EU comparison

Percentage of people rating their life satisfaction between 7 and 10 out of 10 in each European country

Notes:

  1. Adults aged 16 and over rating their life satisfaction between 7 and 10 out of 10.

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Over 7 in 10 (71.8%) adults aged 16 and over in the UK rated their satisfaction with life as 7 or more out of 10 in 2011. This was higher than the EU–28 average of 69.3%. The proportion of those reporting a life satisfaction of 7 or more out of 10 was highest in Denmark (91.0%) and Finland (89.8%) and lowest in Bulgaria (38.3%) and Hungary (43.2%).

Our relationships

Support from family, friends, neighbours or someone else if you needed advice about a serious personal or family matter

In 2011, just under 9 in 10 (88.7%) of people in the UK aged 16 and over reported that they had support from family, friends, neighbours or someone else if they needed support or advice about a serious personal or family matter. This was lower than the EU–28 average of 93.0%. People in the UK along with France (86.1%) and Denmark (88.1%) were least likely to have this support. Slovakia had the highest proportion of people reporting they had support from family, friends, neighbours or someone else (98.8%).

Health

Perceived health status

Over 6 in 10 people (62.7%) aged 16 and over in the UK rated their health status as very good or good, just behind the EU–28 average of 64.0% in 2011. The highest proportion of people who rated their health status as very good or good were in Ireland (75.3%) and Greece (75.0%). The lowest proportions were in Lithuania and Latvia (both 41.1%). 

Where we live

Satisfaction with accommodation 

Just over 8 in 10 (80.2%) of people aged 16 and over in the UK rated their satisfaction with their accommodation as 7 or more out of 10 in 2011, higher than the EU–28 average of 76.9%. Finland had the highest proportion of people who rated their satisfaction with their accommodation as 7 or more out of 10 (90.9%), followed by Denmark and Malta (both 89.7%).  Latvia had the smallest proportion of people rating their satisfaction with their accommodation as 7 or more out of 10 (55.2%). 

Personal finance

Households making ends meet with difficulty or great difficulty

Figure 14: Households making ends meet with difficulty or great difficulty, 2012

EU comparison (1)

Percentage of households who reported making ends meet with difficulty or great difficulty in 2012 by European country

Notes:

  1. Data not available for Ireland.

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Just over 2 in 10 (20.2%) households in the UK reported that they had difficulty or great difficulty making ends meet in 2012 which was below the EU–28 average of 27.7%. The highest proportion of households who reported a difficulty in making ends meet was in Greece (73.1%) and Bulgaria (65.9%) in 2012. The lowest proportion of households that reported difficulty was in Sweden (6.8%), Finland (7.1%) and Germany (9.2%).

Governance

Trust in national Government

Just under a quarter (24%) of people aged 15 and over in the UK reported that they tended to trust their national government in the autumn of 2013, just over the EU–28 average of 23%. The highest proportions of trust were in Sweden (57%) and Luxembourg (51%). The lowest proportions of trust were in Spain (9%) and Greece, Italy and Slovenia (all 10%).

Natural environment

Municipal waste which is recycled, composted or digested 1,2


Figure 15: Percentage of municipal waste which is recycled, composted or digested, 2012 (1)

EU comparison

Percentage of municipal waste which is recycled, composted or digested by European Country in 2012

Notes:

  1. Data is estimated for Slovakia, Lithuania, Czech Republic, Spain, Ireland, Luxembourg and the UK.

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An estimated 46% of the UK’s municipal waste was recycled, composted or digested in 2012, above the EU–28 average of 41%. Germany had the highest proportion of recycled waste at 65%. The countries with the lowest proportions of recycled, composted or digested municipal waste were Romania (estimated at 1%), Malta (12%) and Slovakia (13%).

Notes for European comparisons

  1. Municipal waste is mainly produced by households, though similar wastes from sources such as commerce, offices and public institutions are included.

  2. Anaerobic digestion is a collection of processes by which microorganisms break down biodegradable material in the absence of oxygen. The process is used for industrial or domestic purposes to manage waste and/or to produce fuels.

Background notes

  1. Details of the policy governing the release of new data are available by visiting www.statisticsauthority.gov.uk/assessment/code-of-practice/index.html or from the Media Relations Office email: media.relations@ons.gsi.gov.uk

About the ONS Measuring National Well-being Programme

 

This article is published as part of the ONS Measuring National Well-being Programme.

The programme aims to produce accepted and trusted measures of the well-being of the nation - how the UK as a whole is doing. It is about looking at 'GDP and beyond' and includes:

  • Greater analysis of the national economic accounts, especially to understand household income, expenditure and wealth.

  • Further accounts linked to the national accounts, including the UK Environmental Accounts and valuing household production and 'human capital'.

  • Quality of life measures, looking at different areas of national well-being such as health, relationships, job satisfaction, economic security, education environmental conditions.

  • Working with others to include the measurement of the well-being of children and young people as part of national well-being.

  • Measures of 'personal well-being' - individuals' assessment of their own well-being.

  • Headline indicators to summarise national well-being and the progress we are making as a society.

The programme is underpinned by a communication and engagement workstream, providing links with Cabinet Office and policy departments, international developments, the public and other stakeholders. The programme is working closely with Defra on the measurement of 'sustainable development' to provide a complete picture of national well-being, progress and sustainable development.

Find out more on the Measuring National Well-being website pages.

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