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Characteristics of Workers in Tourism, 2011 - video summary

Released: 06 June 2013

This is a short video looking at the characteristics of workers employed in tourism industries.

In 2011 employment in the UK was 29.9 million.  Of which, 9.1% of this was in tourism characteristic industries. This equates to employment of 2.7 million.

Focusing on those 2.7 million people employed in tourism industries, we will first look at the age distribution of these people. As we can see, 39% of people employed in tourism industries are aged between 16 and 29. This compares to 22% of people in non-tourism industries.

Now, using this graph, we will now look at age distribution in the four main tourism industries. The black rectangles show the size of employment in the four industries. Bringing on the bars for those aged 16-29, we can see that half of those employed in food and beverage serving are in this age group.

Bringing on the bars for the other age groups we can see that passenger transport & vehicle hire and travel agencies have the highest percentage of workers aged over 45.
Next we will look at tourism employment in terms of the nationality of the workers. This chart shows the 2.7 million people who are employed in tourism industries. As we can see, 13.5%, or 0.4 million, are non-UK born. This compares to 8.2% in non tourism industries.

Now we will show the nationality breakdown for the four tourism industries. Again the black rectangles show the size of employment in each industry. Bringing on the bars for UK and non-UK national tourism workers, we can see that ‘accommodation for visitors’ and ‘food and beverage serving’ have the highest percentages of workers of non UK nationality, almost a fifth of all workers in both cases.

This next chart will show where the non-UK nationals who are working in the tourism industry have come from. The black rectangles again show the size of the non-UK national workforce in each industry. If we bring on the bars we can see that for all of the industries, with the exception of accommodation for visitors, the majority of the non-UK nationals are from non EU states. For accommodation for visitors, the largest percentage of workers have come from the EU accession states.

This next chart will illustrate the ten most common nationalities of those working in tourism. As we can see, 15 per cent of non-UK nationals working in these industries were Polish. Next are those of Indian nationality with 5.4%, followed by Bangladeshi and Pakistani at 4.4%.

Lastly we will focus on qualifications of those working in the tourism industry. This chart again shows the 2.7 million people employed in tourism industries, and as we can see, 27 per cent were educated to degree or higher education level. This compares with 40 per cent in non tourism industries.

Looking at the other qualifications for those in tourism industries, we can see that 25% had A-level qualifications, 25.8% had GCSE grade A to C, 12.7% had other qualifications and 9.2% had no qualifications at all.

Using this chart we will now look at the qualifications breakdown for workers in the four tourism industries. Again the black rectangles show the size of employment in the four industries. If we bring on the bars, we can see that the tourism industry with the largest percentage of workers with a degree is culture, sports, recreation and conferences at 43%.

In each industry around half of workers had A Levels or GCSE qualifications. The percentage of workers with ‘other qualifications’ was highest in ‘food and beverage serving’ and ‘passenger transport, vehicle hire and travel agencies’ while in three of the four industries around a tenth of workers has no qualifications, with the exception of culture, sports, recreation and conferences.

Source: Office for National Statistics

Background notes

  1. Details of the policy governing the release of new data are available by visiting www.statisticsauthority.gov.uk/assessment/code-of-practice/index.html or from the Media Relations Office email: media.relations@ons.gsi.gov.uk

Content from the Office for National Statistics.
© Crown Copyright applies unless otherwise stated.