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Chapter 5 - Transport - Life Opportunities Survey

Released: 10 April 2014 Download PDF

5.1 Key findings

  • 'Cost’ was the most common barrier to transport in all transport types1 regardless of an adult’s impairment status. The proportion reporting ‘cost’ as a barrier was highest for taxis/minicabs and lowest for local buses.

  • A higher percentage of adults reported ‘cost’ as a barrier to using motor vehicles in Wave Two only than in Wave One only. This finding was not seen for other transport types and coincided with a rise in the cost of fuel and car insurance2.
  • For adults with impairment at both waves there is evidence that some perceived their impairment to have affected their ability to access all four transport types. This was not the case for the other analysis groups.
  • Specific barrier types tended to be reported by adults at either Wave One only or Wave Two only, rather than at both waves. This suggests that barriers are transient in most cases, rather than fixed.


 

Notes

1. The four transport types included in this chapter are: motor vehicles, local buses, long-distance trains and taxis/minicabs.

2. Data source: Consumer Price Indices, January 2014 Office for National Statistics.

5.2 Aims of this chapter

As we saw in Chapter 2 adults in the LOS can be classified into four groups for analysis:

  • adults with impairment at both waves,

  • offset adults,

  • onset-acquired adults, or

  • adults without impairment at both waves.

These groups reflect the diversity of impairment status, in that impairment status may be stable, or may change over time. A person may have impairments at both waves (group 1) or no impairment at both waves (group 4), or they may no longer have impairments (group 2) or they acquire an impairments at Wave Two (group 3).

Chapter 2 of this report explored changes in participation restriction experienced between Wave One and Wave Two. According to the LOS definition, adults who had a participation restriction in one or more life area will experience barriers. Barriers to transport vary between transport types1; for example, ‘cost’ is a possible barrier to all transport types, whereas ‘parking problems’ only applies to motor vehicles. The barriers reported by adults may change over time. For each life area, it is also possible to see if a barrier was:

  i. reported at both waves,   

  ii. reported at Wave One only,   

  iii. reported at Wave Two only, or   

  iv. not reported at either wave.

This chapter describes the types of barriers to transport experienced by working age (16 to 64) adults, who had a participation restriction at any point in the survey. For these adults the types of barriers that were reported at both waves or at either wave (groups i, ii, and iii) will be examined by group. Four transport types are analysed separately in this chapter: motor vehicles, local buses, long-distance trains and taxis/minicabs.

Notes for 5.2 Aims of this chapter

  1. The four transport types included in this chapter are: motor vehicles, local buses, long-distance trains and taxis/minicabs.

5.3 Types of barriers to using motor vehicles

This section describes the types of barriers experienced by working age adults (16 to 64) who had a participation restriction to using a motor vehicle1 at any point in the survey (as identified by the dark sections of the pie charts (see Figure 5.1). For these adults the types of barriers that were reported at both waves or at either wave (groups i, ii, and iii2) will be examined by group.

Figure 5.1 Percentage of working age (16 to 64) adults with a participation restriction to using motor vehicles [1], by group [2]

Adults aged between 16 and 64, who experienced a participation restriction to using motor vehicles at either or both waves

Figure 5.1 Percentage of working age (16 to 64) adults with a participation restriction to using motor vehicles [1], by group [2]
Source: Life Opportunities Survey - Office for National Statistics

Notes:

  1. An adult had a participation restriction to using a motor vehicle if they had continuous use of a motor vehicle, but did not go out in it as much as they would have liked.
  2. Please refer to definition of longitudinal analysis groups in the Introduction of Life Opportunities Survey - Understanding disability Wave Two Part II report.
  3. Sample sizes have been rounded independently to the nearest 10.
  4. All percentages have been rounded to the nearest 1.
  5. Based on weighted data.

Download chart

The tables presented in this chapter show the top four barriers that were reported by each group, at Wave One only, Wave Two only and both waves. The percentages reflect those who reported each barrier, out of those adults from that particular group who had a barrier to using motor vehicles at either or both waves.

Across all groups ‘cost’ was the most common barrier reported to using motor vehicles at Wave One only, Wave Two only and both waves. ‘Parking problems’ was also among the four highest ranking barriers across all groups.

For all groups, ‘cost’ was more frequently reported at Wave Two only than at Wave One only. This has coincided with above-inflation rises in fuel and car insurance costs over the period covered by the two waves of the survey3. This pattern was not seen for other transport types.

For adults with impairment at both waves and onset-acquired adults there is evidence that some perceived their impairment to have restricted their use of a motor vehicle. At both and either wave, ‘a health condition, illness or impairment’ and ‘a disability’ were commonly reported barriers, by adults with impairments at both waves. Similarly, onset-acquired adults also commonly reported ‘a health condition, illness or impairment’ at Wave Two only, but not at Wave One only or both waves. This finding was not seen for other transport types.

In addition, ‘too busy/not enough time’ and ‘vehicle not available when needed’ tended to be featured in the top four ranking barriers for offset adults, onset-acquired adults and adults without impairment at both waves.

Table 5.1, Adults with impairment at both waves[1]: top four barriers to using motor vehicles[2], by experience of barrier

Adults aged between 16 and 64, who experienced a participation restriction to using motor vehicles at either or both waves[3]

Great Britain
Rank   Barrier at both waves %     Barrier at Wave One only %     Barrier at Wave Two only %
1   Cost 21     Cost 16     Cost 28
2   A health condition, illness or impairment 9     A health condition, illness or impairment 12     A health condition, illness or impairment 15
3   A disability 6     Parking problems 7     A disability 10
4   Parking problems 3     A disability 7     Parking problems 7

Table source: Office for National Statistics

Table notes:

  1. Please refer to definition of longitudinal analysis groups in the Introduction of Life Opportunities Survey - Understanding disability Wave Two Part II report.
  2. An adult had a participation restriction to using motor vehicles if they had continuous use of a motor vehicle, but did not go out in it as much as they would have liked.
  3. Based on weighted data and a sample size of 740 (the unweighted sample figure has been rounded to the nearest 10).
  4. Please see reference tables for data for all barriers.
  5. All percentages have been rounded to the nearest 1.

Download table

Table 5.2, Offset adults[1]: top four barriers to using motor vehicles[2], by experience of barrier

Adults aged between 16 and 64, who experienced a participation restriction to using motor vehicles at either or both waves[3]

Great Britain
Rank   Barrier at both waves %     Barrier at Wave One only %     Barrier at Wave Two only %
1   Cost 15     Cost 25     Cost 29
2   Too busy/not enough time 2     Vehicle not available when needed 9     Too busy/not enough time 10
3   Parking problems 2     Too busy/not enough time 8     Caring responsibilities 6
4   Vehicle not available when needed 2     Parking problems 8     Vehicle not available when needed 5

Table source: Office for National Statistics

Table notes:

  1. Please refer to definition of longitudinal analysis groups in the Introduction of Life Opportunities Survey - Understanding disability Wave Two Part II report.
  2. An adult had a participation restriction to using motor vehicles if they had continuous use of a motor vehicle, but did not go out in it as much as they would have liked.
  3. Based on weighted data and a sample size of 300 (the unweighted sample figure has been rounded to the nearest 10).
  4. Please see reference tables for data for all barriers.
  5. All percentages have been rounded to the nearest 1.

Download table

Table 5.3, Onset-acquired adults[1]: top four barriers to using motor vehicles[2], by experience of barrier

Adults aged between 16 and 64, who experienced a participation restriction to using motor vehicles at either or both waves[3]

Great Britain
Rank   Barrier at both waves %     Barrier at Wave One only %     Barrier at Wave Two only %
1   Cost 19     Cost 18     Cost 38
2   Too busy/not enough time 3     Vehicle not available when needed 6     A health condition, illness or impairment 11
3   Parking problems 3     Too busy/not enough time 6     Parking problems 8
4   n/a n/a     Parking problems 3     Vehicle not available when needed 8

Table source: Office for National Statistics

Table notes:

  1. Please refer to definition of longitudinal analysis groups in the Introduction of Life Opportunities Survey - Understanding disability Wave Two Part II report.
  2. An adult had a participation restriction to using motor vehicles if they had continuous use of a motor vehicle, but did not go out in it as much as they would have liked.
  3. Based on weighted data and a sample size of 200 (the unweighted sample figure has been rounded to the nearest 10).
  4. n/a - not applicable; there were no other barriers reported by 0.5% or over.
  5. Please see reference tables for data for all barriers.
  6. All percentages have been rounded to the nearest 1.

Download table

Table 5.4, Adults without impairment at both waves[1]: top four barriers to using motor vehicles[2], by experience of barrier

Adults aged between 16 and 64, who experienced a participation restriction to using motor vehicles at either or both waves[3]

Great Britain
Rank   Barrier at both waves %     Barrier at Wave One only %     Barrier at Wave Two only %
1   Cost 11     Cost 16     Cost 26
2   Too busy/not enough time 2     Too busy/not enough time 8     Too busy/not enough time 10
3   Vehicle not available when needed 2     Vehicle not available when needed 6     Vehicle not available when needed 8
4   Parking problems 1     Parking problems 5     Parking problems 6

Table source: Office for National Statistics

Table notes:

  1. Please refer to definition of longitudinal analysis groups in the Introduction of Life Opportunities Survey - Understanding disability Wave Two Part II report.
  2. An adult had a participation restriction to using motor vehicles if they had continuous use of a motor vehicle, but did not go out in it as much as they would have liked.
  3. Based on weighted data and a sample size of 790 (the unweighted sample figure has been rounded to the nearest 10).
  4. Please see reference tables for data for all barriers.
  5. All percentages have been rounded to the nearest 1.

Download table

 

Details of all barriers types can be found in the data section of this publication. The data can also be viewed as interactive charts.

Notes for 5.3 Types of barriers to using motor vehicles

  1. An adult had a participation restriction to using a motor vehicle if they had continuous use of a motor vehicle, but did not go out in it as much as they would have liked.

  2. Section 5.2 aims of this chapter provides more details.

  3. Data source: Consumer Price Indices, January 2014 Office for National Statistics. 

5.4 Types of barriers to using local buses

This section describes the types of barriers experienced by working age adults (16 to 64) who had a participation restriction to using local buses1 at any point in the survey (as identified by the dark sections of the pie charts (see Figure 5.2)). For these adults the types of barriers that were reported at both waves or at either wave (groups i, ii, and iii2) will be examined by group.

Figure 5.2 Percentage of working age (16 to 64) adults with a participation restriction to using local buses [1], by group [2]

Adults aged between 16 and 64, who experienced a participation restriction to using local buses at either or both waves

Figure 5.2 Percentage of working age (16 to 64) adults with a participation restriction to using local buses [1], by group [2]
Source: Life Opportunities Survey - Office for National Statistics

Notes:

  1. An adult had a participation restriction to using local buses if they had not used local buses as much as they would have liked to in the last 12 months.
  2. Please refer to definition of longitudinal analysis groups in the Introduction of Life Opportunities Survey - Understanding disability Wave Two Part II report.
  3. Sample sizes have been rounded independently to the nearest 10.
  4. All percentages have been rounded to the nearest 1.
  5. Based on weighted data.

Download chart

The tables presented in this chapter show the top four barriers that were reported by each group, at Wave One only, Wave Two only and both waves. The percentages reflect those who reported each barrier, out of those adults from that particular group who had a barrier to using local buses at either or both waves.

‘Cost’ was the most reported barrier at Wave One only and Wave Two only for all four groups. At both waves, however, ‘transport unavailable’ was the most reported barrier by offset adults, adults without impairment at both waves and onset-acquired adults. A smaller percentage reported ‘cost’ as a barrier to local buses across all groups than for other transport types. This is unsurprising due to the comparatively low cost of travel by local bus, compared with motor vehicles, long-distance trains and taxis/minicabs.

Offset adults, onset-acquired adults and adults without impairment at both waves reported similar common barriers at Wave One only and Wave Two only. The four most common barriers were ‘cost’, ‘transport unavailable’, ‘too busy/not enough time’ and ‘delay and disruption to the service’. Adults with impairment at both waves reported similar common barriers to other groups, but also reported ‘a health condition, illness or impairment’ and ‘a disability’ as barriers to local buses, suggesting some perceived their impairment to be a barrier to using local buses.

Table 5.5, Adults with impairment at both waves[1]: top four barriers to using local buses[2], by experience of barrier

Adults aged between 16 and 64, who experienced a participation restriction to using local buses at either or both waves[3]

Great Britain
Rank   Barrier at both waves %     Barrier at Wave One only %     Barrier at Wave Two only %
1   A health condition, illness or impairment 8     Cost 15     Cost 15
2   Cost 8     A health condition, illness or impairment 13     A health condition, illness or impairment 12
3   A disability 6     Transport unavailable 10     A disability 11
4   Transport unavailable 5     A disability 10     Transport unavailable 8

Table source: Office for National Statistics

Table notes:

  1. Please refer to definition of longitudinal analysis groups in the Introduction of Life Opportunities Survey - Understanding disability Wave Two Part II report.
  2. An adult had a participation restriction to using local buses if they had not used local buses as much as they would have liked to in the last 12 months.
  3. Based on weighted data and a sample size of 1,280 (the unweighted sample figure has been rounded to the nearest 10).
  4. Please see reference tables for data for all barriers.
  5. All percentages have been rounded to the nearest 1.

Download table

Table 5.6, Offset adults[1]: top four barriers to using local buses[2], by experience of barrier

Adults aged between 16 and 64, who experienced a participation restriction to using local buses at either or both waves[3]

Great Britain
Rank   Barrier at both waves %     Barrier at Wave One only %     Barrier at Wave Two only %
1   Transport unavailable 7     Cost 20     Cost 13
2   Cost 5     Transport unavailable 15     Transport unavailable 10
3   Delay and disruption to service 2     Too busy/not enough time 11     Delay and disruption to service 7
4   Lack of information 2     Delay and disruption to service 11     Too busy/not enough time 6

Table source: Office for National Statistics

Table notes:

  1. Please refer to definition of longitudinal analysis groups in the Introduction of Life Opportunities Survey - Understanding disability Wave Two Part II report.
  2. An adult had a participation restriction to using local buses if they had not used local buses as much as they would have liked to in the last 12 months.
  3. Based on weighted data and a sample size of 550 (the unweighted sample figure has been rounded to the nearest 10).
  4. Please see reference tables for data for all barriers.
  5. All percentages have been rounded to the nearest 1.

Download table

Table 5.7, Onset-acquired adults[1]: top four barriers to using local buses[2], by experience of barrier

Adults aged between 16 and 64, who experienced a participation restriction to using local buses at either or both waves[3]

Great Britain
Rank   Barrier at both waves %     Barrier at Wave One only %     Barrier at Wave Two only %
1   Transport unavailable 11     Cost 20     Cost 13
2   Cost 10     Too busy/not enough time 12     Too busy/not enough time 11
3   Too busy/not enough time 2     Transport unavailable 11     Delay and disruption to service 10
4   Anxiety/lack of confidence 2     Delay and disruption to service 9     Transport unavailable 10

Table source: Office for National Statistics

Table notes:

  1. Please refer to definition of longitudinal analysis groups in the Introduction of Life Opportunities Survey - Understanding disability Wave Two Part II report.
  2. An adult had a participation restriction to using local buses if they had not used local buses as much as they would have liked to in the last 12 months.
  3. Based on weighted data and a sample size of 340 (the unweighted sample figure has been rounded to the nearest 10).
  4. Please see reference tables for data for all barriers.
  5. All percentages have been rounded to the nearest 1.

Download table

Table 5.8, Adults without impairment at both waves[1]: top four barriers to using local buses[2], by experience of barrier

Adults aged between 16 and 64, who experienced a participation restriction to using local buses at either or both waves[3]

Great Britain
Rank   Barrier at both waves %     Barrier at Wave One only %     Barrier at Wave Two only %
1   Transport unavailable 9     Transport unavailable 15     Cost 16
2   Cost 6     Cost 14     Transport unavailable 13
3   Too busy/not enough time 2     Too busy/not enough time 10     Delay and disruption to service 9
4   Delay and disruption to service 2     Delay and disruption to service 9     Too busy/not enough time 7

Table source: Office for National Statistics

Table notes:

  1. Please refer to definition of longitudinal analysis groups in the Introduction of Life Opportunities Survey - Understanding disability Wave Two Part II report.
  2. An adult had a participation restriction to using local buses if they had not used local buses as much as they would have liked to in the last 12 months.
  3. Based on weighted data and a sample size of 1,500 (the unweighted sample figure has been rounded to the nearest 10).
  4. Please see reference tables for data for all barriers.
  5. All percentages have been rounded to the nearest 1.

Download table

 

Details of all barriers types can be found in the data section of this publication. The data can also be viewed as interactive charts.

Notes for 5.4 Types of barriers to using local buses

  1. An adult had a participation restriction to using a local bus if they had not used local buses as much as they would have liked to in the last 12 months.

  2. Section 5.2 aims of this chapter provides more details.

5.5 Types of barriers to using long-distance trains

This section describes the types of barriers experienced by working age adults (16 to 64) who had a participation restriction to using long-distance trains1 at any point in the survey (as identified by the dark sections of the pie charts (see Figure 5.3)). For these adults the types of barriers that were reported at both waves or at either wave (groups i, ii, and iii2) will be examined by group.

Figure 5.3 Percentage of working age (16 to 64) adults with a participation restriction to long-distance trains [1], by group [2]

Adults aged between 16 and 64, who experienced a participation restriction to using long-distance trains at either or both waves

Figure 5.3 Percentage of working age (16 to 64) adults with a participation restriction to long-distance trains [1], by group [2]
Source: Life Opportunities Survey - Office for National Statistics

Notes:

  1. An adult had a participation restriction to using long-distance trains if they had not used long-distance trains as much as they would have liked to in the last 12 months.
  2. Please refer to definition of longitudinal analysis groups in the Introduction of Life Opportunities Survey - Understanding disability Wave Two Part II report.
  3. Sample sizes have been rounded independently to the nearest 10.
  4. All percentages have been rounded to the nearest 1.
  5. Based on weighted data.

Download chart

The tables presented in this chapter show the top four barriers that were reported by each group, at Wave One only, Wave Two only and both waves. The percentages reflect those who reported each barrier, out of those adults from that particular group who had a barrier to using long-distance trains at either or both waves.

Across all groups ‘cost’ was the most common barrier reported to long-distance trains at Wave One only, Wave Two only and both waves. This is against a backdrop of above-inflation rises in the cost of train travel every year since 20043.

There is evidence to show that some adults with impairment at both waves perceived their impairment restricted their use of long-distance trains, whereas this was not the case for onset-acquired and offset adults. This may be due to the number and stability of impairment(s) reported by the impairment at both waves group. Adults with impairment at both waves commonly reported ‘a health condition, illness or impairment’ and ‘a disability’ at Wave One only, Wave Two only and both waves, while other groups tended to report ‘too busy/not enough time’, ‘delay and disruption to service’ and ‘transport unavailable’.

Table 5.9, Adults with impairment at both waves[1]: top four barriers to using long-distance trains[2], by experience of barrier

Adults aged between 16 and 64, who experienced a participation restriction to using long-distance trains at either or both waves[3]

Great Britain
Rank   Barrier at both waves %     Barrier at Wave One only %     Barrier at Wave Two only %
1   Cost 15     Cost 24     Cost 23
2   A health condition, illness or impairment 4     A health condition, illness or impairment 13     A health condition, illness or impairment 11
3   A disability 4     Anxiety/lack of confidence 9     A disability 9
4   Anxiety/lack of confidence 4     A disability 8     Difficulty getting to stop or station 7

Table source: Office for National Statistics

Table notes:

  1. Please refer to definition of longitudinal analysis groups in the Introduction of Life Opportunities Survey - Understanding disability Wave Two Part II report.
  2. An adult had a participation restriction to using long-distance trains if they had not used long-distance trains as much as they would have liked to in the last 12 months.
  3. Based on weighted data and a sample size of 1,260 (the unweighted sample figure has been rounded to the nearest 10).
  4. Please see reference tables for data for all barriers.
  5. All percentages have been rounded to the nearest 1.

Download table

Table 5.10, Offset adults[1]: top four barriers to using long-distance trains[2], by experience of barrier

Adults aged between 16 and 64, who experienced a participation restriction to using long-distance trains at either or both waves[3]

Great Britain
Rank   Barrier at both waves %     Barrier at Wave One only %     Barrier at Wave Two only %
1   Cost 15     Cost 32     Cost 25
2   Transport unavailable 2     Too busy/not enough time 7     Transport unavailable 7
3   Too busy/not enough time 1     Delay and disruption to service 6     Too busy/not enough time 5
4   Anxiety/lack of confidence 1     Transport unavailable 5     Overcrowding 3

Table source: Office for National Statistics

Table notes:

  1. Please refer to definition of longitudinal analysis groups in the Introduction of Life Opportunities Survey - Understanding disability Wave Two Part II report.
  2. An adult had a participation restriction to using long-distance trains if they had not used long-distance trains as much as they would have liked to in the last 12 months.
  3. Based on weighted data and a sample size of 560 (the unweighted sample figure has been rounded to the nearest 10).
  4. Please see reference tables for data for all barriers.
  5. All percentages have been rounded to the nearest 1.

Download table

Table 5.11, Onset-acquired adults[1]: top four barriers to using long-distance trains[2], by experience of barrier

Adults aged between 16 and 64, who experienced a participation restriction to using long-distance trains at either or both waves[3]

Great Britain
Rank   Barrier at both waves %     Barrier at Wave One only %     Barrier at Wave Two only %
1   Cost 11     Cost 35     Cost 32
2   Anxiety/lack of confidence 2     Transport unavailable 7     Overcrowding 6
3   Delay and disruption to service 1     Too busy/not enough time 4     Anxiety/lack of confidence 5
4   Difficulty getting to stop or station 1     Overcrowding 3     Transport unavailable 5

Table source: Office for National Statistics

Table notes:

  1. Please refer to definition of longitudinal analysis groups in the Introduction of Life Opportunities Survey - Understanding disability Wave Two Part II report.
  2. An adult had a participation restriction to using long-distance trains if they had not used long-distance trains as much as they would have liked to in the last 12 months.
  3. Based on weighted data and a sample size of 330 (the unweighted sample figure has been rounded to the nearest 10).
  4. Please see reference tables for data for all barriers.
  5. All percentages have been rounded to the nearest 1.

Download table

Table 5.12, Adults without impairment at both waves[1]: top four barriers to using long-distance trains[2], by experience of barrier

Adults aged between 16 and 64, who experienced a participation restriction to using long-distance trains at either or both waves[3]

Great Britain
Rank   Barrier at both waves %     Barrier at Wave One only %     Barrier at Wave Two only %
1   Cost 11     Cost 36     Cost 26
2   Transport unavailable 1     Delay and disruption to service 6     Transport unavailable 5
3   Overcrowding 1     Too busy/not enough time 6     Too busy/not enough time 4
4   Too busy/not enough time 1     Overcrowding 6     Overcrowding 3

Table source: Office for National Statistics

Table notes:

  1. Please refer to definition of longitudinal analysis groups in the Introduction of Life Opportunities Survey - Understanding disability Wave Two Part II report.
  2. An adult had a participation restriction to using long-distance trains if they had not used long-distance trains as much as they would have liked to in the last 12 months.
  3. Based on weighted data and a sample size of 1,320 (the unweighted sample figure has been rounded to the nearest 10).
  4. Please see reference tables for data for all barriers.
  5. All percentages have been rounded to the nearest 1.

Download table

 

Details of all barriers types can be found in the data section of this publication. The data can also be viewed as interactive charts.

Notes for 5.5 Types of barriers to using long-distance trains

  1. An adult had a participation restriction to using a long-distance train if they had not used long-distance trains as much as they would have liked to in the last 12 months.

  2. Section 5.2 aims of this chapter provides more details.

  3. Data source: Consumer Price Indices, January 2014 Office for National Statistics

5.6 Types of barriers to using taxis/minicabs

This section describes the types of barriers experienced by working age adults (16 to 64) who had a participation restriction to using taxis/minicabs1 at any point in the survey (as identified by the dark sections of the pie charts (see Figure 5.4)). For these adults the types of barriers that were reported at both waves or at either wave (groups i, ii, and iii ) will be examined by group.

Figure 5.4 Percentage of working age (16 to 64) adults with a participation restriction to taxis/minicabs [1], by group [2]

Adults aged between 16 and 64, who experienced a participation restriction to using taxis/minicabs at either or both waves

Figure 5.4 Percentage of working age (16 to 64) adults with a participation restriction to taxis/minicabs [1], by group [2]
Source: Life Opportunities Survey - Office for National Statistics

Notes:

  1. An adult had a participation restriction to using taxis/minicabs if they had not used taxis/minicabs as much as they would have liked to in the last 12 months.
  2. Please refer to definition of longitudinal analysis groups in the Introduction of Life Opportunities Survey - Understanding disability Wave Two Part II report.
  3. Sample sizes have been rounded independently to the nearest 10.
  4. All percentages have been rounded to the nearest 1.
  5. Based on weighted data.

Download chart

The tables presented in this chapter show the top four barriers that were reported by each group, at Wave One only, Wave Two only and both waves. The percentages reflect those who reported each barrier, out of those adults from that particular group who had a barrier to using taxis/minicabs at either or both waves.

As in other transport types, ‘cost’ was the most common barrier reported to using taxis/minicabs for all the groups, at both waves, and at Wave One. A higher proportion of adults with barriers to taxis/minicabs reported ‘cost’ as a barrier than for other transport types.

The second most common barrier reported by adults with impairment at both waves was ‘a health condition, illness or impairment’ and ‘a disability’, whereas other groups did not report this barrier. This suggests, as in other transport types, that some adults with impairment at both waves perceived their impairment to be a barrier to using taxis/minicabs, whereas this is not found in the offset or onset-acquired groups.

Table 5.13, Adults with impairment at both waves[1]: top four barriers to using taxis/minicabs[2], by experience of barrier

Adults aged between 16 and 64, who experienced a participation restriction to using taxis/minicabs at either or both waves[3]

Great Britain
Rank   Barrier at both waves %     Barrier at Wave One only %     Barrier at Wave Two only %
1   Cost 26     Cost 31     Cost 34
2   A disability 1     A health condition, illness or impairment 6     A health condition, illness or impairment 4
3   A health condition, illness or impairment 1     Anxiety/lack of confidence 4     A disability 3
4   Anxiety/lack of confidence 1     A disability 4     Difficulty getting in or out of the transport 3

Table source: Office for National Statistics

Table notes:

  1. Please refer to definition of longitudinal analysis groups in the Introduction of Life Opportunities Survey - Understanding disability Wave Two Part II report.
  2. An adult had a participation restriction to using taxis/minicabs if they had not used taxis/minicabs as much as they would have liked to in the last 12 months.
  3. Based on weighted data and a sample size of 1,010 (the unweighted sample figure has been rounded to the nearest 10).
  4. Please see reference tables for data for all barriers.
  5. All percentages have been rounded to the nearest 1.

Download table

Table 5.14, Offset adults[1]: top four barriers to using taxis/minicabs[2], by experience of barrier

Adults aged between 16 and 64, who experienced a participation restriction to using taxis/minicabs at either or both waves[3]

Great Britain
Rank   Barrier at both waves %     Barrier at Wave One only %     Barrier at Wave Two only %
1   Cost 21     Cost 38     Cost 33
2   n/a n/a     Transport unavailable 2     Transport unavailable 3
3   n/a n/a     Attitudes of staff 1     Anxiety/lack of confidence 2
4   n/a n/a     A health condition, illness or impairment 1     Difficulty getting in or out of the transport 1

Table source: Office for National Statistics

Table notes:

  1. Please refer to definition of longitudinal analysis groups in the Introduction of Life Opportunities Survey - Understanding disability Wave Two Part II report.
  2. An adult had a participation restriction to using taxis/minicabs if they had not used taxis/minicabs as much as they would have liked to in the last 12 months.
  3. Based on weighted data and a sample size of 440 (the unweighted sample figure has been rounded to the nearest 10).
  4. n/a - not applicable; there were no other barriers reported by 0.5% or over.
  5. Please see reference tables for data for all barriers.
  6. All percentages have been rounded to the nearest 1.

Download table

Table 5.15, Onset-acquired adults[1]: top four barriers to using taxis/minicabs[2], by experience of barrier

Adults aged between 16 and 64, who experienced a participation restriction to using taxis/minicabs at either or both waves[3]

Great Britain
Rank   Barrier at both waves %     Barrier at Wave One only %     Barrier at Wave Two only %
1   Cost 16     Cost 38     Cost 41
2   n/a n/a     Attitudes of staff 1     Transport unavailable 3
3   n/a n/a     Transport unavailable 1     Anxiety/lack of confidence 2
4   n/a n/a     Anxiety/lack of confidence 1     Difficulty getting in or out of the transport 1

Table source: Office for National Statistics

Table notes:

  1. Please refer to definition of longitudinal analysis groups in the Introduction of Life Opportunities Survey - Understanding disability Wave Two Part II report.
  2. An adult had a participation restriction to using taxis/minicabs if they had not used taxis/minicabs as much as they would have liked to in the last 12 months.
  3. Based on weighted data and a sample size of 280 (the unweighted sample figure has been rounded to the nearest 10).
  4. n/a - not applicable; there were no other barriers reported by 0.5% or over.
  5. Please see reference tables for data for all barriers.
  6. All percentages have been rounded to the nearest 1.

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Table 5.16, Adults without impairment at both waves[1]: top four barriers to using taxis/minicabs[2], by experience of barrier

Adults aged between 16 and 64, who experienced a participation restriction to using taxis/minicabs at either or both waves[3]

Great Britain
Rank   Barrier at both waves %     Barrier at Wave One only %     Barrier at Wave Two only %
1   Cost 21     Cost 33     Cost 40
2   n/a n/a     Transport unavailable 2     Transport unavailable 1
3   n/a n/a     Attitudes of staff 1     Too busy/not enough time 1
4   n/a n/a     Overcrowding 1     Fear of crime 1

Table source: Office for National Statistics

Table notes:

  1. Please refer to definition of longitudinal analysis groups in the Introduction of Life Opportunities Survey - Understanding disability Wave Two Part II report.
  2. An adult had a participation restriction to using taxis/minicabs if they had not used taxis/minicabs as much as they would have liked to in the last 12 months.
  3. Based on weighted data and a sample size of 950 (the unweighted sample figure has been rounded to the nearest 10).
  4. n/a - not applicable; there were no other barriers reported by 0.5% or over.
  5. Please see reference tables for data for all barriers.
  6. All percentages have been rounded to the nearest 1.

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Details of all barriers types can be found in the data section of this publication. The data can also be viewed as interactive charts.

Notes for 5.6 Types of barriers to using taxis/minicabs

  1. An adult had a participation restriction to using a taxi/minicab if they had not used a taxi/minicab as much as they would have liked to in the last 12 months.

Background notes

  1. Details of the policy governing the release of new data are available by visiting www.statisticsauthority.gov.uk/assessment/code-of-practice/index.html or from the Media Relations Office email: media.relations@ons.gsi.gov.uk

Get all the tables for this publication in the data section of this publication .
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