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Glasgow and Liverpool are in the top 5 workless areas for the ninth consecutive year

30.2% of households with at least one person aged 16 to 64 were workless in Glasgow in 2012

Between January and December 2012, Glasgow City had the highest percentage of workless households (those which include at least one person aged 16 to 64 and no-one aged 16 or over is in work) with 30.2% being workless. This was up slightly on the previous year when 28.7% of households were workless.

Over the same period, Liverpool had the second highest percentage of workless households at 28.7%, down from having the highest percentage for the last four years. This was the ninth consecutive year, since records began, that Glasgow, along with Liverpool were in the top five workless areas.

Source: Annual Population Survey household datasets

The common link among some of the areas with the highest percentage of workless households is that they were all heavily industrialised in the last century. Glasgow was once a major force in shipbuilding as well as other engineering but competition overseas has seen that decline since the 1960s. Liverpool had a large manufacturing base and one of the UK’s largest docks, which have both been in decline since the 1970s. Kingston Upon Hull also saw a decline in the heavy industries and fishing that dominated the area in the last century. 

Looking at the five areas with the highest percentage of workless households over the period 2004 to 2012, Glasgow and Liverpool remained the dominant areas. Liverpool remained in the top three throughout this period while Glasgow remained in the top four. In 2012, Kingston upon Hull and Wolverhampton both made a return to the top five. Birmingham on the other hand rose to the top five for the first time since comparable records began.

Source: Annual Population Survey household datasets

In 2012, the lowest percentages of workless households in the UK were concentrated in the South of England. Hampshire had the lowest percentage, at 10.6%, followed by North Northamptonshire (11.2%), Buckinghamshire (11.3%), West Sussex (11.3%) and Surrey (11.4%).

Notes

Estimates within this statistical bulletin only cover households that contain at least one person aged 16 to 64.

A household is defined as a single person, or a group of people living at the same address who have the address as their only or main residence and either share one main meal a day or share living accommodation (or both).

A workless household is a household that contains at least one person aged 16 to 64, where no-one aged 16 or over is in employment.

Rankings are based on Nomenclature of Units for Territorial Statistics Level 3 areas (NUTS3).

Categories: Labour Market, People in Work, People not in Work, Economic Inactivity, Unemployment, Households, Housing and Households
Content from the Office for National Statistics.
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