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Percentage of graduates working in non-graduate jobs has risen

Graduates with an undergraduate degree in medicine had the highest employment rate and annual wage

In April to June 2013 there were 31 million people in the UK not enrolled on any educational course who were either men aged between 21 and 64 or women aged between 21 and 59.

12 million of these people were graduates, meaning they held a qualification above A level standard.

The percentage of graduates in the population has risen from 17% in 1992 to 38% in 2013.

In 2013 graduates were more likely to be employed, less likely to be searching for work and less likely to be out of the labour force (inactive) than those people with lower qualifications or no qualifications. 

However the percentage of graduates working in non-graduate roles has risen, particularly since the 2008/09 recession. This suggests the increasing supply of graduates and the possible decrease in demand for them has had an effect on the type of job they are doing.

We define graduates as all those with a qualification above A level standard, this means that not all graduates have an undergraduate degree. Some may have nursing qualifications or foundation degrees. In fact, 53% of graduates in the UK in 2013 had an undergraduate degree with those who held an undergraduate degree in medicine or dentistry having the highest employment rate and the highest average gross annual wage.   

Categories: Labour Market, People in Work, Earnings, Employment, People not in Work, Unemployment, Children, Education and Skills, Higher Education and Adult Learning, Higher Education Skills and Qualifications, Higher Education Students
Content from the Office for National Statistics.
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