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Release: Crime Statistics, Short Story on Anti-Social Behaviour, 2011/12

Released: 11 April 2013

Contact

John Flatley

Crime, Regional and Data Access Division

crimestatistics@ons.gsi.gov.uk

Telephone: +44 (0)20 7592 8695

Categories: Crime, Crime and Justice, Crime Trends, Crime in England and Wales, Criminal Damage and Anti-Social Behaviour

Frequency of release: One off

Language: English

Geographical coverage: England and Wales

Geographical breakdown: Country

Survey name(s): Crime Survey for England and Wales

  • According to the 2011/12 Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW), overall, 15% of adults had a high level of perceived anti-social behaviour (ASB) in their local area in the last 12 months, showing no change from the previous year.

  • One in ten (10%) believed that the level of anti-social behaviour in their local area over the past few years had ‘gone up a lot’, in comparison with almost half (49%) who believed that in England and Wales it had ‘gone up a lot’.

  • Thirty per cent of people had personally experienced or witnessed at least one incident of anti-social behaviour in their local area in the last 12 months.

  • The most common type of anti-social behaviour experienced or witnessed – by around one in eight (12%) – was drink related behaviour. Of those respondents who experienced drink related behaviour and were asked further details, 7% reported witnessing this type of behaviour every/almost every day and around a third (32%) at least once a week.

  • According to the 2012 Commercial Victimisation Survey (CVS), overall, an estimated 12% of business premises (across the four sectors covered by the survey) had experienced at least one incident of anti-social behaviour in the 12 months prior to interview.

  • Of these 12% of business premises that reported being affected, drink related behaviour and groups hanging around on the street were the most frequently experienced types of anti-social behaviour, affecting around one-third (35%) of such premises.

  • Drink related behaviour was the most commonly experienced type of anti-social behaviour in premises in the accommodation and food sector, which includes pubs and restaurants, affecting 43% of those premises that had experienced ASB. Problems with groups hanging around on the street was the most commonly experienced type of anti-social behaviour in the retail and wholesale sector, affecting 40% of those premises that had experienced ASB.

Following the Home Secretary’s acceptance of the recommendations of the National Statistician’s Review of crime statistics in June 2011 the collation and publication of crime statistics moved to the ONS on 1 April 2012. For previous publications, please see the Home Office webpages.

The Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW) is a face-to-face survey in which people resident in households in England and Wales are asked about their experiences of crime and anti-social behaviour in the 12 months prior to the interview. Being a household survey, the CSEW does not cover crime against businesses. The survey is weighted to adjust for possible non-response bias and to ensure the sample reflects the profile of the general population.

The Commercial Victimisation Survey (CVS) provides information on the volume and type of crime committed against businesses in England and Wales by sector. This was launched following a recommendation of the National Statistician’s review of crime statistics. The CVS is a telephone victimisation survey in which businesses in England and Wales are asked about their experiences of a range of crimes in the 12 months prior to interview. A total of 4,017 businesses from the manufacturing, retail and wholesale, transportation and storage, and accommodation and food sectors were interviewed in the 2012 CVS (approximately 1,000 from each sector). More information on the methodology of the survey and the first 2012 CVS report are available from the Home Office webpages.

For information on how to interpret the crime statistics, please see the User Guide to Crime Statistics for England and Wales.

Crime Statistics Advisory Committee

In line with the National Statistician’s recommendations, an independent Crime Statistics Advisory Committee has also been formed to provide advice on issues related to the collection and presentation of these statistics. Please see the UK Statistics Authority website for further information and minutes of meetings.

Further survey information

A technical report is available providing information on CSEW survey design, weighting and survey response. The latest report is the 2011/12 Crime Survey for England and Wales Technical Report, Volume One.

Questionnaires for the survey these analyses are based on, and for the latest survey currently being used in the field, are available from the Crime statistics methodology page.

Anonymised datasets from the CSEW / BCS (in SPSS format) are available on the UK Data Service through the Economic and Social Data Service (ESDS). Researchers, including students, who need data for dissertations or practical work can use these datasets.

Further information on the methodology of the CVS and the first 2012 CVS report are available from the Home Office webpages.

Contact

If you have any queries regarding crime statistics for England and Wales please email crimestatistics@ons.gsi.gov.uk.

The United Kingdom Statistics Authority has designated these statistics as National Statistics, in accordance with the Statistics and Registration Service Act 2007 and signifying compliance with the Code of Practice for Official Statistics.

Designation can be broadly interpreted to mean that the statistics:

  • meet identified user needs;
  • are well explained and readily accessible;
  • are produced according to sound methods; and
  • are managed impartially and objectively in the public interest.

Once statistics have been designated as National Statistics it is a statutory requirement that the Code of Practice shall continue to be observed.

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