Skip to content

Statistical bulletin: Consumer Price Inflation, November 2013 This product is designated as National Statistics

Released: 17 December 2013 Download PDF

Key points

  • The Consumer Prices Index (CPI) grew by 2.1% in the year to November 2013, down from 2.2% in October.
  • The largest contributions to the fall in the rate came from food and the utilities (gas and electricity). These were partially offset by upward contributions from the transport sector and from some aspects of recreation & culture.
  • CPIH grew by 1.9% in the year to November 2013, down from 2.0% in October. RPIJ grew by 2.0%, up from 1.9%.

A brief description of Consumer Price Inflation

Consumer price inflation is the speed at which the prices of goods and services bought by households rise or fall. Consumer price inflation is estimated by using price indices. One way to understand a price index is to think of a very large shopping basket containing all the goods and services bought by households. The price index estimates changes to the total cost of this basket. ONS consumer price indices are published monthly.

A price index can be used to measure inflation in a number of ways. The most common is to look at how the index has changed over a year. This is calculated by comparing the price index for the latest month with the same month a year ago. This is known as the 12-month inflation rate. This bulletin measures inflation to November 2013, so the 12-month rate measures changes in prices between November 2012 and November 2013.

ONS publishes a range of measures of consumer price and other price inflation. A tale of many price indices summarises information on the different measures. 

Consumer Prices Index (CPI)

What is the CPI?

The CPI is a measure of consumer price inflation produced to international standards and in line with European regulations. First published in 1997 as the Harmonised Index of Consumer Prices (HICP), the CPI is the inflation measure used in the Government’s target for inflation.

The CPI is also used for purposes such as uprating pensions, wages and benefits and can aid in the understanding of inflation on family budgets. For more information see 'Users and uses of consumer price inflation statistics'.

Latest Figure and Long-Term Trend

The CPI 12-month rate (the amount prices change over a year) between November 2012 and November 2013 stood at 2.1%. This means that a basket of goods and services that cost £100.00 in November 2012 would have cost £102.10 in November 2013. The 12-month rates for October and November show a notable drop from the broadly consistent trend seen between Spring 2012 and September 2013.

Over the last five years, the three main contributors to the 12-month inflation rate have been food & non-alcoholic beverages, housing, water, electricity, gas & other fuels, and transport (including motor fuels). Combined, these three sectors have, on average, accounted for over half of the 12-month inflation rate each month.

Figure A below shows the CPI 12-month rate over the last 10 years. Table A below shows the CPI 1-month (the amount prices change between two consecutive months) and 12-month rates and index values for the last year. A larger version of the chart can be viewed by clicking on it (HTML version only).

Figure A: CPI 12-month inflation rate for the last 10 years: November 2003 to November 2013

United Kingdom

Figure A: CPI 12-month inflation rate for the last 10 years: November 2003 to November 2013
Source: Office for National Statistics

Download chart

 

 

 

 

Table A: CPI index values, 1-month and 12-month inflation rates: November 2012 to November 2013

United Kingdom

  Index (UK, 2005 = 100) 1-month rate 12-month rate
2012 Nov 124.4 0.2 2.7
Dec 125.0 0.5 2.7
2013 Jan 124.4 -0.5 2.7
Feb 125.2 0.7 2.8
Mar 125.6 0.3 2.8
Apr 125.9 0.2 2.4
May 126.1 0.2 2.7
Jun 125.9 -0.2 2.9
Jul 125.8 0.0 2.8
Aug 126.4 0.4 2.7
Sep 126.8 0.4 2.7
Oct 126.9 0.1 2.2
Nov 127.0 0.1 2.1

Table source: Office for National Statistics

Table notes:

  1. All items Consumer Prices Index.

Download table

Consumer Prices Index (CPI): What are the main movements?

This section explains which goods and services had the biggest impact on the change to the 12-month rate between October and November 2013 and (where relevant) considers the longer-term inflationary trends for these goods and services.

The change in the CPI 12-month rate can be calculated by comparing the 12-month rates for two consecutive months. An alternative, and equally valid approach, is to calculate it by comparing the price change between the latest two months and the price change between the same two months a year ago. Explaining the contribution to change in the 12-month rate is a diagrammatic explanation of the calculation.

The CPI rose by 0.1% between October and November 2013, compared with a rise of 0.2% between the same two months in 2012. The 1-month movement was therefore 0.1 percentage points lower this year compared with last year. This led to the CPI 12-month rate falling from 2.2% in October to 2.1% in November.

The largest downward contributions to the change in the CPI 12-month rate between October and November 2013 came from:

  • food & non-alcoholic beverages: prices, overall, were little changed between October and November 2013 compared with a rise of 1.1% between the same two months a year ago. The main downward contributions came from fruit, where prices rose by less than a year ago, and vegetables, where prices fell this year but rose a year ago. For some fresh produce, there were reports of low yields in 2012 caused by poor weather conditions. There was also a small downward effect from bread & cereals where prices fell slightly this year but rose a year ago.

  • housing & household services: prices, overall, were little changed between October and November 2013 compared with a rise of 0.6% between the same two months a year ago. The effect came almost entirely from gas and electricity and relates to the timing of price rises: none of the recently announced rises has entered the index this month whereas last winter’s increases began to affect the index in November 2012.

  • restaurants & hotels: prices, overall, rose by less between October and November this year than between the same two months in 2012. The downward effect came from both accommodation services, particularly from hotel overnight stays, and catering services.

The largest upward contributions to the change in the CPI 12-month rate between October and November 2013 came from:

  • transport: prices, overall, fell by 0.5% between October and November 2013 compared with a fall of 1.0% between the same two months a year ago. Within the transport sector, the main upward contribution came from motor fuels. Petrol prices fell by 1.7 pence per litre between October and November this year compared with a larger fall of 3.0 pence per litre between the same two months a year ago. There were also smaller upward contributions from air transport and the purchase of vehicles.

  • recreation & culture: prices, overall, rose by 0.4% between October and November this year, compared with a negligible change between the same two months in 2012. The upward contribution came from games, toys & hobbies (particularly computer games) and data processing equipment.

Figure B below shows the contributions from each part of the CPI basket of goods and services. A larger version of the chart can be viewed by clicking on it (HTML version only).

Figure B: Contributions to the change in the CPI 12-month rate: November 2013

United Kingdom

Figure B: Contributions to the change in the CPI 12-month rate: November 2013
Source: Office for National Statistics

Notes:

  1. Individual contributions may not sum to the total due to rounding.
  2. More information on the contents of each group can be found in table 3 at the end of the bulletin.

Download chart

 

CPIH

CPIH is a measure of UK consumer price inflation that includes owner occupiers’ housing costs (OOH). These are the costs of housing services associated with owning, maintaining and living in one’s own home. OOH does not include costs such as utility bills and minor repairs and maintenance which are already included in the index. CPIH uses an approach called rental equivalence to measure OOH. Rental equivalence uses the rent paid for an equivalent house as a proxy for the costs faced by an owner occupier. In other words this answers the question “how much would I have to pay in rent to live in a home like mine?” for an owner occupier. OOH does not seek to capture increases in house prices. Although, this may be inconsistent with some users’ expectations of measures of OOH, the inclusion of an asset price and therefore capital gains makes the measure less suitable for a measure of consumption. OOH currently accounts for just over 12% of the expenditure weight of CPIH. This has increased gradually from a weight of 10% in 2005.

Currently, the method of calculation, the population coverage and the basket of goods and services are the same as the Consumer Prices Index (CPI), with the exception of OOH. The method of deriving the weights for CPIH and the data used for these are also the same as for CPI, with the exception of OOH. This can result in some differences from the CPI.

On 21 November 2013, the UK Statistics Authority confirmed the designation of CPIH as a National Statistic. This follows ONS implementing a number of enhancements set out by the Authority in its assessment of consumer price statistics (Statistics on Consumer Price Inflation), published on 25 July 2013. ONS has removed the experimental statistics classification from CPIH. For further information on CPIH please see Introducing the new CPIH measure of Consumer Price Inflation, 2005 to 2012.

In November 2013, the 12-month rate (the rate at which prices increased between November 2012 and November 2013) for CPIH stood at 1.9%, down from 2.0% in October.

The difference between the CPI and CPIH annual rates in November 2013 was 0.2 percentage points, the same as the difference in October. Owner occupiers’ housing costs rose by 0.1% between October and November 2013, and also by 0.1% between October and November 2012. The 1-month movement was therefore the same in both years and this meant that OOH had no impact on the change in the overall CPIH 12-month rate between the two months.

Figure C below shows the CPIH and OOH component 12-month rates since January 2006 (the earliest date for which the CPIH 12-month rate can be calculated). The CPI 12-month rate has been included for comparative purposes. Table B below shows the CPIH and OOH component 1-month and 12-month rates and index values for the last year. A larger version of the chart can be viewed by clicking on it (HTML version only).

Figure C: CPIH, OOH component and CPI 12-month rates since January 2006

United Kingdom

Figure C: CPIH, OOH component and CPI 12-month rates since January 2006
Source: Office for National Statistics

Notes:

  1. The time series for this chart will be gradually increased up to a time span of 10 years as more periods of data become available.
  2. The UK Statistics Authority now designates CPIH and OOH as National Statistics (Please refer to Background Note 1).

Download chart

Table B: CPIH and OOH component index values, 1-month and 12-month rates

United Kingdom

  CPIH Index1    (UK, 2005 = 100) OOH Index1    (UK, 2005 = 100) CPIH 1-month1 rate OOH 1-month1 rate CPIH 12-month1 rate OOH 12-month1 rate
2012 Nov 122.5 106.9 0.2 0.1 2.5 1.0
Dec 123.0 107.0 0.4 0.1 2.5 1.0
2013 Jan 122.5 107.2 -0.4 0.2 2.5 1.0
Feb 123.2 107.2 0.6 0.0 2.6 1.0
Mar 123.6 107.2 0.3 0.1 2.6 1.0
Apr 123.8 107.3 0.2 0.1 2.2 1.0
May 124.0 107.4 0.2 0.1 2.5 1.0
Jun 123.8 107.5 -0.2 0.1 2.7 1.0
Jul 123.8 107.6 0.0 0.1 2.5 1.0
Aug 124.3 107.6 0.4 0.1 2.5 1.0
Sep 124.7 107.7 0.3 0.1 2.5 1.0
Oct 124.8 107.8 0.1 0.1 2.0 1.0
Nov 124.8 107.9 0.1 0.1 1.9 1.0

Table source: Office for National Statistics

Table notes:

  1. The UK Statistics Authority now designates CPIH and OOH as National Statistics (Please refer to Background Note 1).

Download table

Retail Prices Index (RPI) and RPIJ

In accordance with the Statistics and Registration Service Act 2007, the Retail Prices Index and its derivatives have been assessed against the Code of Practice for Official Statistics and found not to meet the required standard for designation as National Statistics. The full assessment report can be found on the UK Statistics Authority website.

The RPI is a long-standing measure of UK inflation that has historically been used for a wide range of purposes such as the indexation of pensions and rents and index-linked gilts. For further information see 'Users and uses of consumer price inflation statistics'.

RPIJ is an improved variant of the Retail Prices Index which is calculated using formulae that meet international standards. The rationale for creating RPIJ was to give users a better alternative to the RPI if their needs were for a measure of inflation based on the same population, classifications, weights etc as the RPI. Currently, RPIJ also acts as an analytical series, in that it allows users to see the impact of using the Jevons (which meets international standards) in place of the Carli formula (which does not meet international standards) in the RPI. The use of the different formulae at the elementary aggregate level is currently the only difference between the two indices. ONS does not produce detailed goods and services indices for RPIJ.

On 21 November 2013, the UK Statistics Authority confirmed the designation of RPIJ as a National Statistic. This follows ONS implementing a number of enhancements set out by the Authority in its assessment of consumer price statistics (Statistics on Consumer Price Inflation), published on 25 July 2013. ONS has removed the experimental statistics classification from RPIJ.  For further information on RPIJ please see Introducing the new RPIJ measure of Consumer Price Inflation, 1997 to 2012.

In November 2013, the 12-month rate for RPIJ stood at 2.0%, up from 1.9% in October. Although the RPIJ 12-month rate is slightly higher than for the previous month, both observations are below the relatively stable, but higher, RPIJ inflation witnessed previously during 2013. RPIJ and CPIH have tracked each other closely over the last two years.

The RPI 12-month rate for November stood at 2.6%, meaning that it was 0.6 percentage points higher than it would have been had it used formulae that meet international standards.

Figure D below shows the RPI and RPIJ 12-month rates for the last 10 years. Over this period the RPIJ 12-month rate has been, on average, 0.5 percentage points lower than the RPI. Cumulatively, inflation as measured by the RPI is 38.0% over this period, compared with 31.6% as measured by the RPIJ. The use of the Carli formula has therefore added 6.4 percentage points to the change in prices over the last 10 years. A larger version of the chart can be viewed by clicking on it (HTML version only).

Table C shows the RPI and RPIJ 1-month and 12-month rates and index values for the last year.  

Figure D: RPI and RPIJ 12-month rates for the last 10 years: November 2003 to November 2013

United Kingdom

Figure D: RPI and RPIJ 12-month rates for the last 10 years: November 2003 to November 2013
Source: Office for National Statistics

Notes:

  1. The RPI has been de-designated as a National Statistic. The UK Statistics Authority now designates RPIJ as a National Statistic (Please refer to Background Note 1).

Download chart

 

Table C: RPI and RPIJ index values, 1-month and 12-month rates

United Kingdom

  RPI Index 1 (UK, 1987 = 100) RPIJ Index 1 (UK, 1987 = 100) RPI 12-month1 rate RPIJ 12-month1 rate RPI 1-month1 rate RPIJ 1-month1 rate
2012 Nov 245.6 230.5 3.0 2.4 0.0 0.0
Dec 246.8 231.5 3.1 2.5 0.5 0.4
2013 Jan 245.8 230.6 3.3 2.7 -0.4 -0.4
Feb 247.6 231.7 3.2 2.6 0.7 0.5
Mar 248.7 232.6 3.3 2.7 0.4 0.4
Apr 249.5 233.2 2.9 2.3 0.3 0.3
May 250.0 233.5 3.1 2.5 0.2 0.1
Jun 249.7 233.2 3.3 2.7 -0.1 -0.1
Jul 249.7 233.2 3.1 2.6 0.0 0.0
Aug 251.0 234.2 3.3 2.6 0.5 0.4
Sep 251.9 235.0 3.2 2.5 0.4 0.3
Oct 251.9 234.9 2.6 1.9 0.0 0.0
Nov 252.1 235.1 2.6 2.0 0.1 0.1

Table source: Office for National Statistics

Table notes:

  1. The RPI has been de-designated as a National Statistic. The UK Statistics Authority now designates RPIJ as a National Statistic (Please refer to Background Note 1).

Download table

For users who want to understand the causes of the difference between the CPI and RPI, please see Table 5 in the Consumer Price Inflation Reference Tables of the November Release on the ONS website. 

Guide to Data

Table D outlines where data for all consumer price inflation statistics can be found.

Table D: Guide to Data

  Statistical Bulletin Detailed Briefing Note Reference Tables (Excel Format) Time Series Dataset
CPI H, T, D H, D H, T, D T, D
CPIY : H H, T T
CPI-CT : H H, T T
CPIH1 H, T, D H H, T, D T, D
CPIHY1 : H H, T T
RPIJ1 H, T H H, T T
RPI2 H, T H, D H, T, D T, D
RPIX2 : H H, T T
RPIY2 : H H, T T
SARPIY2 : H H, T T
TPI2 : H H, T T
RPI Pensioner Indices2 : : H, T T
International Comparisons : : H, T T

Table source: Office for National Statistics

Table notes:

  1. These statistics are newly designated as National Statistics by the UK Statistics Authority.

  2. These statistics are not National Statistics.

  3. H = Latest headline figures, D = Detailed data (including disaggregations), T = Time series data.

Download table

Background notes

  1. News

    On 21 November 2013, the UK Statistics Authority confirmed the designation of CPIH and RPIJ as National Statistics. This follows ONS implementing a number of enhancements set out by the Authority in its assessment of consumer price statistics (Statistics on Consumer Price Inflation), published on 25 July 2013. ONS has removed the experimental statistics classification from CPIH and RPIJ.

    In recent years, ONS has consulted on significant changes to the consumer price inflation statistics. For 2014, the only proposed changes fall within the remit of the standard annual basket update. Details will be published in the standard annual article describing the changes to the basket of goods and services.

    An updated version of the Consumer Price Indices Technical Manual will be published on 31 December 2013. The manual is being updated to include information on the new CPIH and RPIJ measures of Inflation. More information can be found in Background Note 3.  

  2. Understanding and accessing the data

    A full description of how consumer price indices are compiled is given in the Consumer Price Indices Technical Manual. This is supplemented by other technical articles available from the guidance and methodology section of the ONS website. 

    A more detailed quality report for this statistical bulletin is available. The report assesses consumer price inflation statistics against standard dimensions of quality such as relevance, accuracy and accessibility. The report was last updated in October 2013.

    The mini Triennial Review (1.75 Mb Pdf) of the CPI and RPI Central Collection of Prices is available.

    Further information on consumer price inflation statistics, including details of the methodology used to construct the indices, articles, historic data etc, is available on the Consumer Price Indices Taxonomy page.

    The most efficient way to access the latest consumer price inflation data and briefing on the ONS website is via the CPI key figure on the homepage.

    In response to user feedback, all consumer price inflation data are available in one location. The Consumer Price Inflation Reference Tables (1.22 Mb Excel sheet) are provided via an excel file.

    To further help users, very detailed CPI data are now available including the individual price quotes and item indices that underpin the CPI. Please note that the data that are published are at a level which means that no individual retailer or service provider will be able to be identified. Previously the data published covered January 1996 to June 2013. The data for July to September 2013 are also now available. These data are updated once a quarter with around a two month lag with the latest CPI publication. For example, the data will next be updated when the February 2014 CPI is published on 25 March 2014, at which point the detailed data published will be extended to December 2013.

    Internationally, the CPI is known as the Harmonised Index of Consumer Prices (HICP). HICPs are calculated in each Member State of the European Union according to rules specified in a series of European regulations developed by the European Commission (Eurostat) in conjunction with the EU Member States. Eurostat releases figures for the Harmonised Index of Consumer Prices (HICP) for the month of November 2013 for EU Member States, together with an EU average, on 17 December 2013. A summary of the latest European data is available from Eurostat’s database tables. Further information on HICP for the European Union, Eurozone and other EU Member States is available from Eurostat's HICP web page

  3. Methods - CPI and other measures of inflation

    The CPI, CPIH, RPIJ and RPI are compiled using the same underlying price data, based on a large and representative selection of almost 700 individual goods and services for which price movements are measured in around 150 randomly selected areas throughout the UK. Around 180,000 separate price quotations are used every month to compile the indices. The outlets in which the prices are collected are selected randomly. Expenditure weights are held constant for one year at a time.

    The selection of goods and services that are priced to compile these indices is reviewed annually. The contents of the 2013 basket are described in an article Consumer Prices Index and Retail Prices Index: the 2013 Basket of Goods and Services (354.4 Kb Pdf) . The expenditure weights used to compile the indices are also updated each year. Additional details of the updated weights for 2013 are available from the National Statistics website in an article published on 26 April 2013 entitled Consumer Prices Index and Retail Prices Index: Updating Weights for 2013.

    Rates of change for the CPI and CPIH are calculated from unrounded index levels, rather than from the published indices, which are rounded to one decimal place. The use of unrounded indices increases the accuracy of the calculation. The unrounded index levels for the CPI and CPIH are available on request. By contrast, rates of change for the RPI and RPIJ are calculated from the published rounded indices.

    Detailed explanations of the main uses and methodology used to construct the RPI and how it differs from the CPI can be found in Chapter 9 of the Consumer Price Indices Technical Manual. More information on CPIH (Introducing the new CPIH measure of Consumer Price Inflation, 2005 to 2012) and RPIJ (Introducing the new RPIJ measure of Consumer Price Inflation, 1997 to 2012) can be found in the articles linked. 

    Information on those measures will be added to the Technical Manual in the next update which is due to be published before the end of 2013. 'Users and uses of consumer price inflation statistics' provides further details of how consumer price statistics are used more generally.

  4. Revisions Policy

    On 15 October 2013, ONS published a revisions policy for its suite of consumer price inflation statistics. The policy re-affirms the existing practices for CPI and RPI and sets out the policies for the new CPIH and RPIJ measures.

    In summary; CPI, CPIH and RPIJ are revisable in theory though revisions only occur under exceptional circumstances. The RPI is never revised once published.

  5. Publication Policy

    This bulletin includes the November 2013 data, collected on 12 November 2013. Future publication dates for this statistical bulletin are available to January 2016 (the publication of the December 2015 inflation figures). Publication dates from February 2015 onwards are provisional.

    Details of the policy governing the release of new data are available from the Media Relations Office. Also available is a list of the names of those given pre-release access to the contents of this release.

    Consumer price inflation for December 2012 to December 2013 will be published on 14 January 2014.

    Follow us on Twitter or join us at Facebook. View the latest podcasts on YouTube.

    Media contact:

    Tel:  Luke Croydon   + 44 (0) 845 6041858
    Out of hours media line   + 44 (0) 7867 906553
    Email:  media.relations@ons.gsi.gov.uk

    Statistical contact:
    Tel:  Philip Gooding +44 (0) 1633 455896
    Email:  philip.gooding@ons.gsi.gov.uk 
    Email:  cpi@ons.gsi.gov.uk

    CPI/RPI recorded message (available after 9.45am on release day): 
    Tel: + 44 (0) 1633 456961

    CPI/RPI Enquiries:
    Tel: + 44 (0) 1633 456900

  6. Details of the policy governing the release of new data are available by visiting www.statisticsauthority.gov.uk/assessment/code-of-practice/index.html or from the Media Relations Office email: media.relations@ons.gsi.gov.uk

    These National Statistics are produced to high professional standards and released according to the arrangements approved by the UK Statistics Authority.

Statistical contacts

Name Phone Department Email
Philip Gooding +44 (0)1633 455896 Prices, ONS cpi@ons.gsi.gov.uk
Get all the tables for this publication in the data section of this publication .
Content from the Office for National Statistics.
© Crown Copyright applies unless otherwise stated.