Skip to content

Statistical bulletin: Consumer Price Indices, July 2012 This product is designated as National Statistics

Released: 14 August 2012 Download PDF

Key points

  • The Consumer Prices Index (CPI) annual inflation stands at 2.6 per cent in July 2012, up from 2.4 per cent in June.
  • The largest upward pressures on the change in the CPI rate came from transport (particularly air fares) and clothing & footwear.
  • The CPI stands at 122.5 in July 2012 based on 2005 = 100.
  • The Retail Prices Index (RPI) annual inflation stands at 3.2 per cent in July 2012, up from 2.8 per cent in June.
  • The largest upward pressures on the change in the RPI rate came from the purchase of cars, air fares, clothing & footwear and housing.
  • The RPI stands at 242.1 in July 2012 based on January 1987 = 100.

A brief description of Consumer Price Indices

Consumer price indices measure the change in the general level of prices charged for goods and services bought for the purpose of household consumption in the UK. A convenient way to understand the nature of these indices is to envisage a very large shopping basket comprising all the different goods and services typically bought by households. As the prices of individual items in this basket vary, the total cost of the basket will also vary. The CPI and RPI measure changes in this total cost.

Consumer Prices Index (CPI)

The CPI is the main UK domestic measure of consumer price inflation for macroeconomic purposes. It forms the basis for the Government’s target for inflation that the Bank of England’s Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) is required to achieve. Since April 2011 the CPI has also been used for the indexation of benefits, tax credits and public service pensions.

This section shows the 1-month and 12-month percentage change (the amount by which the figures have increased or decreased compared with a month ago and a year ago respectively). Figure A shows the 12-month percentage change. Table A shows the CPI index values plus the 1-month and 12-month percentage changes.

The CPI rose by 0.1 per cent between June and July this year. This is only the second time since the CPI was launched in 1996 that prices have, overall, increased between June and July (the previous time was in 2005 when there was also a 0.1 per cent increase).

The CPI rose by 2.6 per cent between July 2011 and July 2012. With the exception of last month’s annual inflation figure (2.4 per cent), this is the lowest rate of annual inflation since late 2009.

Figure A: CPI 12-month percentage change (July 2010 to July 2012)

United Kingdom

This chart shows the percentage changes over 12 months from July 2010 to July 2012
Source: Office for National Statistics

Download chart

Table A: CPI 1-month and 12-month percentage change (July 2011 to July 2012)

United Kingdom

 
    Index1 (UK, 2005 = 100) Percentage change over 1 month Percentage change over 12 months
2011 Jul 119.4 0.0 4.4
Aug 120.1 0.6 4.5
Sep 120.9 0.6 5.2
Oct 121.0 0.1 5.0
Nov 121.2 0.2 4.8
Dec 121.7 0.4 4.2
2012 Jan 121.1 -0.5 3.6
Feb 121.8 0.6 3.4
Mar 122.2 0.3 3.5
Apr 122.9 0.6 3.0
May 122.8 -0.1 2.8
Jun 122.3 -0.4 2.4
Jul 122.5 0.1 2.6

Table source: Office for National Statistics

Table notes:

  1. All items Consumer Prices Index

Download table

Consumer Prices Index (CPI): Briefing on the monthly movement between June and July 2012

This section explains the change in the CPI between the latest two months. Table B shows the 1-month percentage change for each of the CPI divisions.  Figure B shows the contribution of each division to the overall 1-month change.

The CPI rose by 0.1 per cent between June and July this year. The largest upward contributions to the 1-month change came from:

  • transport: prices, overall, rose by 1.0 per cent, contributing 0.17 percentage points to the total CPI 1-month change. The largest upward pressure came from air fares, where prices, overall, rose by 21.7 per cent on the month. This was partially offset by downward contributions from petrol and diesel and the purchase of motor vehicles.

  • housing & household services: prices, overall, rose by 0.4 per cent, contributing 0.06 percentage points to the total CPI 1-month change. The main upward pressure came from rents.

The largest downward contributions to the 1-month change in the CPI between June and July 2012 came from:

  • clothing & footwear: prices, overall, fell by 2.6 per cent, contributing  minus 0.17 percentage points to the total CPI 1-month change. The majority of the downward pressure came from garments.

  • furniture & household goods: prices, overall, fell by 1.1 per cent, contributing minus 0.07 percentage points to the total CPI 1-month change. With the exception of major household appliances (eg washing machines), textiles and tools, there were downward pressures from across the sector – most notably from furniture and furnishings.

Table B: CPI 1-month percentage change to July 2012

United Kingdom

Percentage change
Food & non-alcoholic beverages 0.2
Alcohol & tobacco 0.8
Clothing & footwear -2.6
Housing & household services 0.4
Furniture & household goods -1.1
Health 0.0
Transport 1.0
Communication 0.4
Recreation & culture 0.2
Education 0.0
Restaurants & hotels 0.2
Miscellaneous goods & services 0.1
CPI All Items 0.1

Table source: Office for National Statistics

Download table

Figure B: Contributions to the CPI 1-month percentage change (in total 0.1 per cent): July 2012

United Kingdom

This chart shows the contributions that attribute to the one month change.
Source: Office for National Statistics

Notes:

  1. Individual contributions may not sum to the total due to rounding

Download chart

Consumer Prices Index (CPI): Briefing on the change to the 12-month rate between June and July 2012

This section explains how the CPI 12-month rate (this month’s CPI compared with the CPI for the same month a year ago) has changed between the latest two months. Figure C shows the contribution of each CPI division to the overall change in the 12-month rate.

The change in the CPI 12-month rate is calculated by comparing the price changes between the latest two months and the same two months a year ago. This year the CPI rose by 0.1 per cent between June and July compared with a negligible change between the same two months a year ago.

The 1-month movement was therefore 0.1 percentage points higher this year and this led to the CPI 12-month rate rising from 2.4 per cent in June to 2.6 per cent in July 2012. The 0.1 percentage point difference is due to rounding.

The most significant upward contributions to the change in the CPI 12-month rate between June and July 2012 came from:

  • transport: prices, overall, rose by 1.0 per cent between June and July this year compared with a more modest rise of 0.6 per cent a year ago. This contributed 0.08 percentage points to the change in the CPI 12-month rate. The largest upward pressure came from air fares where prices, overall, rose by 21.7 per cent on last month (the biggest June to July increase since 2004) compared with 9.8 per cent a year ago.

    Flights to European destinations were the main contributor to this upward pressure. The purchase of second-hand cars was the other significant contributor, with prices falling more slowly than a year ago (1.0 per cent compared with 3.1 per cent). Partially offsetting these rises were downward pressures from petrol and diesel, maintenance & repairs, rail and sea transport.

  • clothing & footwear: prices, overall, fell by 2.6 per cent between June and July this year compared with a fall of 3.5 per cent a year ago. This contributed 0.05 per cent to the change in the CPI 12-month rate.

    This is the smallest fall in clothing prices between a June and July since the CPI was launched in 1996 and follows the record fall in prices between a May and June witnessed last month. The total fall in clothing prices from May to July 2012 is in line with the decreases seen between these two months in previous years.

There were no significant downward contributions to the change in the CPI 12-month rate between June and July 2012.

Figure C: Contributions to the change in the CPI 12-month rate (in total 0.2 percentage points): July 2012

United Kingdom

This chart shows the contributions to the 12 month rate.
Source: Office for National Statistics

Notes:

  1. Individual contributions may not sum to the total due to rounding

Download chart

Consumer Prices Index (CPI): Briefing on the 12-month rate to July 2012

This section explains how the CPI this month has changed compared with the same month a year ago. Table C shows the 12-month percentage change for each of the CPI divisions.  Figure D shows the contribution of each division to the overall 12-month change.

The most significant upward contributions to the CPI 12-month rate to July 2012 came from:

  • housing & household services: which contributed 0.8 percentage points, with the main upward effects coming from gas, which contributed 0.3 percentage points, plus rent and electricity, which contributed 0.2 percentage points apiece.

  • restaurants & hotels: which contributed 0.4 percentage points, with the main upward effect coming from catering which contributed 0.3 percentage points.

Table C: CPI 12-month rate to July 2012

United Kingdom

Percentage change
Food & non-alcoholic beverages 2.1
Alcohol & tobacco 5.0
Clothing & footwear                         0.1
Housing & household services 6.1
Furniture & household goods 3.5
Health 3.0
Transport 1.3
Communication 4.4
Recreation & culture 0.4
Education 5.1
Restaurants & hotels 3.2
Miscellaneous goods & services 1.7
CPI All Items 2.6

Table source: Office for National Statistics

Download table

Figure D: Contributions to the CPI 12-month rate (in total 2.6 per cent): July 2012

United Kingdom

This chart provides the percentage contributions to the 12 month rate
Source: Office for National Statistics

Notes:

  1. Individual contributions may not sum to the total due to rounding

Download chart

Other measures of Consumer Prices Index (CPI) Inflation:

This section shows for other measures of CPI inflation the percentage change over 1-month and 12-months (the amount by which the figures have increased or decreased between last month and this month and year on year respectively).

Figure E compares the 12-month percentage change for the CPI with the 12-month percentage change for these other measures.

Consumer Prices Index excluding indirect taxes (CPIY)

The CPIY is the same as the all items CPI except that it excludes price changes which are directly due to changes in indirect taxation (such as VAT).

In the year to July, the CPIY rose by 2.5 per cent, up from 2.4 per cent in June. Therefore, the CPIY 12-month rate rose by 0.1 percentage points between June and July compared with an increase of 0.2 percentage points in the CPI 12-month rate between the same two months.

The impact of rounding is the main reason for the small difference in the changes in the CPIY and CPI 12-month rates between June and July. There were no changes to indirect taxation that impacted on the CPI between those months.

Consumer Prices Index at constant tax rates (CPI-CT)

The CPI-CT is the same as the CPI except that tax rates are kept constant at the rates they were in the base period (currently January 2012) and vehicle excise duty and television licence fees are excluded.

In the year to July, CPI-CT rose by 2.3 per cent, up from 2.2 per cent in June. Therefore, the CPI-CT 12-month rate rose by 0.1 percentage points between June and July compared with an increase of 0.2 percentage points in the CPI 12-month rate between the same two months.

The impact of rounding is the main reason for the small difference in the changes in the CPI-CT and CPI 12-month rates between June and July. There were no changes to indirect taxation that impacted on the CPI between those months.

Figure E: CPI measures of inflation 12-month percentage change (July 2010 to July 2012)

United Kingdom

This chart provides a comparison between CPI, CPIY and CPI-CT between July 2010 and July 2012.
Source: Office for National Statistics

Download chart

Retail Prices Index (RPI) compared with Consumer Prices Index (CPI):

The RPI is the most long standing measure of inflation in the UK. The RPI, like the CPI, measures inflation with reference to the changing cost of a fixed basket of goods and services.

This section compares the percentage change over 12-months for the RPI with the comparable change for the CPI and explains any significant differences between the two. Figure F charts the 12-month rate for the CPI and RPI.

In the year to July, the all items RPI rose by 3.2 per cent, up from 2.8 per cent in June. The RPI 12-month rate has therefore increased by 0.4 percentage points between June and July compared with a rise of 0.2 percentage points in the CPI 12-month rate between the same two months.

Figure F: RPI and CPI 12-month percentage change (July 2010 to July 2012)

United Kingdom

This chart provides a comparison of RPI with CPI between July 2010 and July 2012.
Source: Office for National Statistics

Download chart

The larger rise in the RPI 12-month rate than the CPI 12-month rate is mainly due to:

  • other differences including weights: which increased the RPI 12-month rate relative to the CPI 12-month rate by 0.10 percentage points between June and July. The effect came mainly from motor fuels, financial services, second-hand cars, sea fares and recording media, partially offset by air fares and miscellaneous services,

  • owner occupiers’ housing costs: including mortgage interest payments and house depreciation which increased the RPI 12-month rate by 0.06 percentage points but are excluded from the CPI,

  • other differences in coverage of goods and services: which increased the RPI 12-month rate relative to the CPI 12-month rate by 0.06 percentage points.

Other measures of Retail Prices Index (RPI) Inflation:

This section shows for other measures of RPI inflation the percentage change over 1-month and 12-months (the amount by which the figures have increased or decreased between last month and this month and year on year respectively).

Figure G compares the 12-month percentage change for the RPI with the 12-month percentage change for these other measures.

All items Retail Prices Index excluding mortgage interest payments (RPIX)

The RPIX is the same as the all items RPI except for mortgage interest payments, which are excluded from RPIX.

In the year to July, the RPIX rose by 3.2 per cent, up from 2.8 per cent in June. Therefore the RPIX and RPI 12-month rates both rose by 0.4 percentage points between June and July.

Mortgage interest payments had only a small upward impact on the change in the RPI 12-month rate between June and July. This impact was not sufficient to cause a difference between the changes to the RPIX and RPI 12-month rates between these two months.

All items Retail Prices Index excluding mortgage interest payments and indirect taxes (RPIY)

The RPIY is the same as the all items RPI except that it excludes price changes which are directly due to changes in indirect taxation (such as VAT) and mortgage interest payments.

In the year to July, the RPIY rose by 3.2 per cent, up from 2.9 per cent in June. Therefore the RPIY 12-month rate rose by 0.3 percentage points compared with an increase of 0.4 percentage points for the RPI. The smaller rise in the RPIY 12-month rate compared with the RPI 12-month rate is mainly due to rounding.

Figure G: RPI measures of inflation 12-month percentage change (July 2010 to July 2012)

United Kingdom

This chart provides a comparison between RPI, RPIY and RPIX between July 2010 and July 2012.
Source: Office for National Statistics

Download chart

Notable Consumer Prices Index (CPI) and Retail Prices Index (RPI) Records:

This section highlights notable movements and trends in the CPI and RPI and places them in historical context.

Notable CPI records

United Kingdom

 
Food & non-alcoholic beverages Annual rate +2.1%, down from +2.3% last month
Lowest since June 2010 (+1.9%)
Fuel & lubricants Annual rate -2.0%, down from -1.7% last month
Lowest since September 2009 (-6.6%)

Table source: Office for National Statistics

Download table

Notable RPI records

United Kingdom

Non Seasonal Food Annual rate +2.6%, down from +2.9% last month
Lowest since July 2010 (+2.4%)
Alcoholic Drink Annual rate +2.8%, unchanged from last month
Lowest since February 2010 (+2.7%)

Table source: Office for National Statistics

Download table

Data tables

CPI and RPI Reference Tables, July 2012: (1.29 Mb Excel sheet)  This spreadsheet pulls together the tables that were previously published in the old style Consumer Price Indices Statistical Bulletin and Focus on Consumer Prices publication. A correlation index is included to show the old and new naming conventions and where the tables were previously published, for example: RPI All items 1947-2012 or RP02 & Table 4.1 in Focus is now the new Table 20.

Background notes

  1. Public consultation on the recommended method of reflecting owner occupiers' housing costs in a new additional measure of consumer price inflation; and the strategy for Consumer Price statistics

    At its 30 April 2012 meeting, the Consumer Prices Advisory Committee (CPAC) recommended the rental equivalence method for reflecting owner occupiers' housing costs in a new additional measure of consumer price inflation.  ONS welcomes views on this recommendation and its strategy for consumer price statistics, with the public consultation closing on 31 August 2012.

  2. Next month

    Inflation for August 2011 to August 2012 will be published on 18 September 2012. CPI and RPI inflation rates between August 2011 and July 2012 were 2.0 per cent and 2.5 per cent respectively. Inflation rates for August 2011 to August 2012 will take account of price changes between July 2012 and August 2012.

  3. Relevance

    The CPI is the main UK domestic measure of consumer price inflation for macroeconomic purposes. It forms the basis for the Government’s target for inflation that the Bank of England’s Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) is required to achieve. Since April 2011 the CPI has also been used for the indexation of benefits, tax credits and public service pensions. The uprating is based on the 12-month change in the September CPI.

    Internationally, the CPI is known as the Harmonised Index of Consumer Prices (HICP). HICPs are calculated in each Member State of the European Union, according to rules specified in a series of European regulations developed by Eurostat in conjunction with the EU Member States. HICPs are used to compare inflation rates across the European Union. Since January 1999, the HICP has also been used by the European Central Bank (ECB) as the measure of price stability across the euro area.

  4. Methodology

    The CPI and the RPI are compiled using the same underlying price data, based on a large and representative selection of almost 700 individual goods and services for which price movements are measured in around 150 randomly selected areas throughout the UK. Around 180,000 separate price quotations are used every month to compile the indices. The outlets in which the prices are collected are selected randomly. Expenditure weights are held constant for one year at a time.

    The selection of goods and services that are priced to compile the CPI and RPI is reviewed annually. The contents of the 2012 basket are described in an article Consumer Prices Index and Retail Prices Index: the 2012 Basket of Goods and Services (274.7 Kb Pdf) . The expenditure weights used to compile the indices are also updated each year. Additional details of the updated CPI and RPI weights for 2012 are available from the National Statistics website in an article published on 24 April 2012 entitled Consumer Prices Index and Retail Prices Index: Updating Weights for 2012.   

    Rates of change for the CPI are calculated from unrounded index levels, rather than from the published indices, which are rounded to one decimal place. The use of unrounded indices increases the accuracy of the calculation. The unrounded index levels are available on request. By contrast, rates of change for the RPI are calculated from the published rounded indices. 

  5. Reliability

    Once the RPI indices are published they are never revised. CPI indices are revisable although the only time the CPI all items index has been revised was when the index was re-referenced to 2005=100, which took place with the publication of the January 2006 indices.

  6. Comparability

    The CPI’s coverage of goods and services was extended in stages in the areas of health, education, childcare and insurance, with effect from the January 2000, 2001 and 2002 indices. In 2000, there was also a change to the population basis for the weights which was broadened from private households to include expenditure by foreign visitors and residents of institutional households. Further details can be found in a series of articles in the CPI methodology section of the Office for National Statistics website.

    The official CPI series starts in 1996 but estimates for earlier periods are available back to 1988. These estimates are broadly consistent with data from 1996 but should be treated with some caution. An article about historical estimates (106 Kb Pdf) provides more detail.

    RPI data are available back to 1947 but have been re-referenced on several occasions since then, generally accompanied by changes to the coverage and/or structure of the detailed sub-components. Details of these changes are given in Appendices 1 and 2 of the Consumer Price Indices Technical Manual (754.3 Kb Pdf) .

  7. Other measures of inflation – main uses and methodological details

    Detailed explanations of the main uses and methodology used to construct the ‘other measures of inflation’ included within this statistical bulletin and how they differ from the CPI can be found in Chapters 9 and 10 of the Consumer Price Indices Technical Manual (754.3 Kb Pdf) . In addition this article 'How ONS consumer price statistics are used' provides further details of how consumer price statistics are used more generally.

    • All items Retail Prices Index (RPI): the RPI is the most long-standing general purpose measure of inflation in the UK. Historically the uses of the RPI include the indexation of various prices and incomes and the uprating of pensions, state benefits and index-linked gilts, as well as the revalorisation of excise duties. Please note, though, that since April 2011 the CPI has been used to uprate benefits, tax credits and public service pensions.

    The main differences between the CPI and RPI are:

    • Population base: CPI includes all UK private and institutional households and foreign visitors to the UK. The RPI includes private households only and excludes the highest income households and pensioner households mainly dependent on state benefits; these excluded private households account for around 13 per cent of all UK household expenditure.

    • Item coverage: the most significant difference is that the CPI excludes a number of items relating to housing costs (such as mortgage interest payments, house depreciation and council tax) that are included in the RPI.

    • Index methodology – formula: the CPI mainly uses the geometric mean whereas the RPI uses the arithmetic mean to combine individual prices at the first stage of aggregation.

    • Item coding: the CPI uses a standard international classification system whereas the RPI uses a system unique to itself and not used elsewhere. The different approaches reflect the fact that the CPI is used to compare inflation rates across Europe so a standard framework is required; the RPI is mainly used within the UK only.

    Here is a breakdown of the differences between the CPI and RPI (62.9 Kb Pdf) annual inflation rates.

    Also available is an explanation of the increased impact that the different formulae used to construct the CPI and RPI (61 Kb Pdf) had on the indices during 2010.

    • All items Retail Prices Index excluding mortgage interest payments (RPIX): this index is the same as the all items RPI but it excludes the mortgage interest payments component.

    • All items Retail Prices Index excluding mortgage interest payments and indirect taxes (RPIY): is an index designed to measure movements in ‘core’ prices as the index excludes price changes which are directly due to changes in indirect taxation (for example VAT; excise duties on tobacco, alcohol and petrol; local authority taxation; vehicle excise duty; and television licence fees) and mortgage interest payments. The purpose of the index is to obtain a better indication of inflationary pressures at times when prices are directly influenced by government-driven changes.

    • Consumer Prices Index excluding indirect taxes (CPIY):  is an index designed to measure movements in ‘underlying prices’ as it excludes price changes which are directly due to changes in indirect taxation (for example VAT; excise duties on tobacco, alcohol and petrol; vehicle excise duty; and television licence fees). As with the RPIY, its main purpose is to obtain a better indication of inflationary pressures at times when prices are directly influenced by government-driven changes.

    • Consumer Prices Index at constant tax rates (CPI-CT): is an index where tax rates are kept constant at the rates as they were in the base period (currently January 2012) and which excludes vehicle excise duty and television licence fees. The analytical value of the CPI-CT is when it is compared with the CPI; differences in the monthly and annual rates of change between the two indices provide an indication of the impact of tax changes on the CPI.  

  8. Accessibility

    The most efficient way to access the latest CPI and RPI data and briefing on the new website is via the CPI or RPI key figures on the homepage.

    In response to user feedback, we have taken the opportunity to make all CPI and RPI data available in one location. These CPI and RPI Reference Tables (1.29 Mb Excel sheet) are provided via a 'printer friendly' excel file.

    To further help users, very detailed CPI data are now available including the individual price quotes and item indices that underpin the CPI. Please note that the data that are published are at a level which means that no individual retailer or service provider will be able to be identified. The data published covers January 1996 to March 2012. These data are updated once a quarter with around a two month lag with the latest CPI publication. For example, the data will next be updated when the August CPI is published on 18 September 2012, at which point the detailed data published will be extended to June 2012.

    This bulletin includes the July 2012 data, collected on 17 July 2012. Future publication dates (43.6 Kb Pdf) for this Statistical Bulletin are available (now includes dates to January 2014). The Office for National Statistics (ONS) is proposing to push back the publication of its Producer Price Index Statistical Bulletin, following an internal quality assurance review. From the September 2012 data release, which will be published on 16 October, the Producer Price Index releases will be published at the same time as the Consumer Price Indices and House Price Indices.

    The European Commission (Eurostat) released figures for the harmonised index of consumer prices (HICP) for the month of July 2012 for EU Member States, together with an EU average, on 16 July 2012. Further information on HICP for the European Union, Eurozone and other EU Member States is available from Eurostat's HICP web page

  9. Further information

    A more detailed quality report (141.9 Kb Pdf) for this statistical bulletin is available on the ONS website. The report assesses the CPI and RPI against standard dimensions of quality such as relevance, accuracy and accessibility. The report was last updated in December 2011.

    The mini Triennial Review (1.75 Mb Pdf) of the CPI and RPI Central Collection of Prices is also available.

    A full description of how the CPI and RPI are compiled is given in the Consumer Price Indices Technical Manual. (754.3 Kb Pdf)

    Further information on the CPI and RPI, including details of the methodology used to construct the indices, articles, historic data etc. is available on the Consumer Price Indices Taxonomy page.

  10. General

    Details of the policy governing the release of new data are available from the Media Relations Office. Also available is a list of the names of those given pre-release access (111.6 Kb Pdf) to the contents of this release.

    Bank and Treasury officials were informed at 5pm on the Friday before publication that an open letter was not needed this month between the Governor of the Bank of England and the Chancellor of the Exchequer.

    Follow us on Twitter or join us at Facebook. View the latest podcasts on YouTube.

    ONS has recently published commentary, analysis and policy on 'Special events' which may affect statistical outputs. For full details go the Special events page on the ONS website.

    During 2010, an assessment team from the UK Statistics Authority conducted a review of the Office for National Statistics’ Consumer Price Indices. Their remit was to assess compliance with the Code of Practice for Official Statistics. In December 2010, the team published their conclusions as Assessment Report 79.

    While carrying out the assessment, the team also researched and published Monitoring Brief 7/2010 – Communicating Inflation.

    Following this assessment and ONS’s subsequent response, the UK Statistics Authority, on 31 January 2012 confirmed the designation of the CPI and RPI as National Statistics, in accordance with the Statistics and Registration Service Act 2007 and signifying compliance with the Code of Practice for Official Statistics.

    Designation can be broadly interpreted to mean that the statistics:

    • meet identified user needs,

    • are well explained and readily accessible,

    • are produced according to sound methods,

    • are managed impartially and objectively in the public interest.

    Once statistics have been designated as National Statistics it is a statutory requirement that the Code of Practice shall continue to be observed.

  11. Media contact:

    Tel:  David Bradbury + 44 (0) 845 6041858
    Emergency on-call + 44 (0) 7867 906553
    Email: media.relations@ons.gsi.gov.uk

    CPI/RPI recorded message (available after 9.45am on release day):
    Tel: + 44 (0) 1633 456961

    CPI/RPI Enquiries:
    Tel: + 44 (0) 1633 456900

  12. Details of the policy governing the release of new data are available by visiting www.statisticsauthority.gov.uk/assessment/code-of-practice/index.html or from the Media Relations Office email: media.relations@ons.gsi.gov.uk

    These National Statistics are produced to high professional standards and released according to the arrangements approved by the UK Statistics Authority.

Statistical contacts

Name Phone Department Email
Richard Campbell +44 (0)1633 451536 Prices, ONS cpi@ons.gsi.gov.uk
Get all the tables for this publication in the data section of this publication .
Content from the Office for National Statistics.
© Crown Copyright applies unless otherwise stated.