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Release: 2011 Census, Qualifications and Labour Market Participation in England and Wales

Released: 18 June 2014

Contact

Tristan Browne

Census Analysis

census.analysis.inbox@ons.gsi.gov.uk

Telephone: +44 (0)1633 45 5951

Categories: Labour Market, People in Work, Employment, Children, Education and Skills, School and College Education, School and College Skills and Qualifications, Higher Education and Adult Learning, Higher Education Skills and Qualifications

Frequency of release: Ad-hoc

Language: English

Geographical coverage: England and Wales

Geographical breakdown: Local Authority and County

Survey name(s): Census

  • Fewer than half (48.5%) of those aged 25 to 64 with no qualifications were in employment compared with 8 in 10 (80.7%) of those with at least one qualification.

  • While there was only a small difference in employment rates between the two highest levels of qualification, 2+ A Levels or equivalent (83.5%) and degree level or above (85.3%), those aged 25 to 64 with a degree level or above qualification were more likely to work in occupations with higher earnings.

  • The unemployment rate for both men (12.9%) and women (10.8%) aged 25 to 64 with no qualifications was more than double the rate for those with at least one qualification (5.2% for men, 4.3% for women).

  • The range of employment rates across local authorities was widest for those aged 25 to 64 with no qualifications (37.2 percentage points) and narrowed as the qualification level increased, with the narrowest range for those with a degree level or above (11.3 percentage points).

  • All five local authorities with the highest employment rates for those aged 25 to 64 with no qualifications were rural areas, with the highest rate in Eden at 67.2%, whereas all five with the lowest employment rates for those with no qualifications were urban areas, with four of these being in Inner London and the lowest being Tower Hamlets at 30.0%.

How people’s highest level of qualification relates to their economic activity, including employment rates and work pattern by qualification level, economic inactivity, reasons for inactivity and unemployment.

2011 Census statistics provide a rich source of information about the number, distribution and characteristics of the population in England and Wales. The statistics are used to understand similarities and differences in the population locally, regionally and nationally. This information underpins the allocation of billions of pounds of public money to provide services like education, transport and health. Decisions are taken every day using census statistics.

These National Statistics are produced to high professional standards and released according to the arrangements approved by the UK Statistics Authority.

Content from the Office for National Statistics.
© Crown Copyright applies unless otherwise stated.