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2011 Census - unpaid care snapshot

Carers Week 10 – 16 June

In the England and Wales, there are around six million people providing unpaid care for an ill, frail or disabled family member or friend. These people are called carers.

Carers Week is a UK-wide annual awareness campaign. Its aim is to improve the lives of carers and the people they care for. To coincide with Carers Week, we have drawn together some of the headline information about unpaid carers from the 2011 Census in England and Wales.

These data have already been published in previous census releases. Each chart is accompanied by links to the full data table in Excel. Further links to full analysis and other Census data are also available.


Video summary: Provision of unpaid care in England and Wales in 2011 


Infographic 1: Inequality in the provision of unpaid care

Carers infographic
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Interactive map: Unpaid care

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Do you provide unpaid care? How many hours of care do you provide per week? Use the map to explore the pattern in your local area. You can also compare with data from the 2001 Census. You can also add this interactive map to your website.

› View the unpaid care interactive map

Chart 1: The breakdown of unpaid care categories for England and Wales, 2001 and 2011 comparison

Download the data table
(49 Kb Excel sheet)
Carers - National chart

Chart 2: Unpaid care provision: by age and sex in England and in Wales, 2011

Key Points:
  • Unpaid care is highest for both men and women in the 50-64 age range. Women provide a higher share across ages 0-64 but men aged 50-64 do provide a higher percentage of unpaid care than women aged 25-49.

  • The possibility of becoming an unpaid carer increases up to age 64. People in the 50-64 age range are the most likely to have an elderly parent to care for.

  • Becoming an unpaid carer in your 50s increases your chances of leaving the labour market for good, is associated with health problems and restricts your social and leisure activities.

Download the data table (19 Kb Excel sheet)
Carers Chart 2

Chart 3: Ratio of 'Not Good' health among males and females providing 50 hours or more unpaid care per week to those providing no unpaid care, English regions and Wales, 2011

Key Points:
  • Males and Females across English regions and Wales are between 2 and 3 times more likely to have Not Good general health if they are providing 50 hours or more unpaid care per week than if they provide no unpaid care.

  • Males have higher ratios than females, suggesting male health is affected more by providing unpaid care than females.

  • The inequality in Not Good health between unpaid carers providing 50+ hours per week and those providing no unpaid care was highest in London, the South East and the East of England for each sex: In these regions, males were three times more likely to have Not Good Health if they provided 50+ hours of unpaid care per week than males providing no unpaid care. 

Download the data table (30 Kb Excel sheet)
Carers Chart 3

Note: Not Good' general health was derived from those who answered either 'Fair', 'Bad' or 'Very Bad' to the general health question in the 2011 Census


Chart 4: Percentage of men / women in selected economic positions providing unpaid care, and ratio of percentages of a) those providing 50 hours' or more care per week who are in "Not good" health to b) those who provide no unpaid care

Key Points:
  • Across all these economic positions, women provide more unpaid care than men, whether working full-time, part-time, unemployed or a student

  • In England and Wales 126,121 men and 88,268 women are working full-time and providing 50 hours or more unpaid care per week; these men and women are 2.4 times and 2.7 times more likely to have Not Good health than those working full-time not providing unpaid care .

  • The greatest health divide between unpaid carers and those providing no unpaid care is among students; both male and female students are more than 4 times more likely to have Not Good health if providing 50 hours or more unpaid care per week compared those not providing unpaid care.

Download the data table (19.5 Kb Excel sheet)
Carers Chart 4
 

Note: Ratio values higher than 1 suggest health is worse amongst those providing 50 hours or more unpaid care. The ratio represents how many more times health is 'Not Good'.


Chart 5: Percentage of unpaid care provided: by sex in English regions and Wales, 2011

Key points:
  • A gender inequality in unpaid care is present across all English regions and Wales, with females taking on a greater share of the unpaid care burden.

  • Those regions with the lowest percentages of female unpaid carers have higher percentages of women working full-time or part-time

  • A higher percentage of Males in Wales provided unpaid care than did females in London

Download the data table (18.5 Kb Excel sheet)
Carers Chart 5

Infographic 2: Percentage of unpaid care provided by 5 to 17-year-olds: by sex in English regions and Wales, 2011

Download the data table (18 Kb Excel sheet)  
Carers - Young carers map

Chart 6: Percentage of young unpaid carers with ‘Not Good’ general health by extent of unpaid care provision per week: ratio of those providing 50 or more hours per week to those providing no unpaid care in English regions and Wales, 2011

Key Points:
  • Across all English regions and Wales, a higher percentage of girls than boys provide unpaid care

  • The bias in gender roles associated with caring seen at older ages begin at the youngest ages, whether in the south, midlands or north.

  • Although London had the lowest percentage of unpaid carers overall, amongst the young it was more closely aligned with other English regions.

  • Unpaid care increased between 2001 and 2011 across all regions; however, it is the Southern regions and London which experienced the greatest increases.

Download the data table (19.5 Kb Excel sheet)  
Carers Chart 6

Want to know more about the wide range of data from 2011 Census?

Content from the Office for National Statistics.
© Crown Copyright applies unless otherwise stated.